Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

The cost of glaucoma care: Small group of patients accounts for large part of costs

Date:
September 18, 2012
Source:
University of Michigan Health System
Summary:
A small subset of patients account for a large proportion of all glaucoma-related charges in the U.S., according to new data. These findings have importance for future evaluations of the cost-effectiveness of screening and treatment for glaucoma.

A small subset of patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) account for a large proportion of all glaucoma-related charges in the United States, according to new data published by researchers at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center and Washington University, St. Louis.

Related Articles


These findings have importance for future evaluations of the cost-effectiveness of screening and treatment for glaucoma.

"We've identified risk factors associated with patients who are the costliest recipients of glaucoma-related eye care," says Joshua D. Stein, M.D., M.S., glaucoma specialist at Kellogg. "Among these factors are younger age, living in the northeastern United States, undergoing cataract surgery, and having other eye conditions. Understanding the characteristics of these individuals and finding ways to reduce disease burden and costs associated with their care can result in substantial cost savings."

The study, published in the September 2012 issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, reviewed claims data from 19,927 patients with newly diagnosed OAG who were enrolled in a large U.S. managed care network.

The researchers identified glaucoma-related charges for all such patients from 2001 through 2009. They found that the costliest 5 percent of enrollees were responsible for $10,202,871, or 24 percent, of all glaucoma-related charges. They also found that glaucoma patients generally consume the greatest relative share of resources during their first six months of care after diagnosis.

"Although there have been several studies examining the cost of caring for patients with glaucoma, most have been based on individuals who have already been diagnosed, and few have examined changes in cost of care over time," says Stein. "In this investigation, we examined two questions: What is the pattern of resource use for patients with OAG during the first seven years after disease onset, and what are the characteristics of those patients who have the greatest glaucoma-related resource use."

A chronic, progressive, incurable disease that affects more than 2 million individuals in the United States and many more worldwide, OAG is the most common cause of blindness among African Americans. OAG is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. Caring for patients with OAG in the United States carries a total societal cost estimated at nearly $1 billion annually.

"Developing an understanding of the resource use of people with glaucoma and identifying those expected to have the largest resource use is important in a resource-constrained health care environment," says Stein. "Further, by collecting longitudinal information on resource use we can better quantify the value of slowing glaucoma progression through various interventions."

Stein is a member of U-M's Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, which brings together hundreds of U-M researchers who study and test ways to improve patient care.

Citation: Longitudinal Trends in Resource Use in an Incident Cohort of Open-Angle Glaucoma Patients: Resource Use in Open-Angle Glaucoma. American Journal of Ophthalmology, September, 2012.

Authors: Joshua D. Stein, M.D., M.S.; Leslie M. Niziol, M.S.; David C. Musch, Ph.D., M.P.H; Paul P. Lee, M.D., J.D.; Sameer V. Kotak, M.S.; Colleen M. Peters, M.A.; Steven M. Kymes, Ph.D.

For more information about glaucoma care and research at the Kellogg Eye Center, visit http://kellogg.umich.edu/patientcare/glaucoma.service.html


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Joshua D. Stein, Leslie M. Niziol, David C. Musch, Paul P. Lee, Sameer V. Kotak, Colleen M. Peters, Steven M. Kymes. Longitudinal Trends in Resource Use in an Incident Cohort of Open-Angle Glaucoma Patients: Resource Use in Open-Angle Glaucoma. American Journal of Ophthalmology, 2012; 154 (3): 452 DOI: 10.1016/j.ajo.2012.03.032

Cite This Page:

University of Michigan Health System. "The cost of glaucoma care: Small group of patients accounts for large part of costs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120918184758.htm>.
University of Michigan Health System. (2012, September 18). The cost of glaucoma care: Small group of patients accounts for large part of costs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120918184758.htm
University of Michigan Health System. "The cost of glaucoma care: Small group of patients accounts for large part of costs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120918184758.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The MelaFind device is a pain-free way to check suspicious moles for melanoma, without the need for a biopsy. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battling Multiple Myeloma

Battling Multiple Myeloma

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The answer isn’t always found in new drugs – repurposing an ‘old’ drug that could mean better multiple myeloma treatment, and hope. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) New information that is linking chronic inflammation in the prostate and prostate cancer, which may help doctors and patients prevent cancer in the future. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) Blood transfusions are proving crucial to young sickle cell patients by helping prevent strokes, even when there is no outward sign of brain injury. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins