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How will smart cars affect the future of driving?

Date:
October 5, 2012
Source:
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Summary:
California, Nevada, and Florida have already made driverless cars street-legal, and continuing advances in the technology have led many to predict that the commercialization of automated vehicles is a real possibility in the not-so-distant future. As driverless vehicles become more commonplace, it is important to understand how humans interact with this new technology.

California, Nevada, and Florida have already made driverless cars street-legal, and continuing advances in the technology have led many to predict that the commercialization of automated vehicles is a real possibility in the not-so-distant future. As driverless vehicles become more commonplace, it is important to understand how humans interact with this new technology. The Human Factors special issue on automation, featuring the latest articles on designing automated vehicles with the driver in mind, is now available online.

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"With an almost exponential increase in the development of new technologies for driver assistance and support in vehicles, the topic of this special issue seemed very appropriate," said Guest Editor Natasha Merat. "The issue brings together research results on the effect of automation in vehicles on human factors and driver behavior and provides a valuable collection of papers from North America and Europe outlining the most recent research in the area."

The research in this issue represents a range of topics, including in-vehicle warning systems, driver-system interaction, user experience, and drivers' willingness to accept and trust smart cars.

"Rapidly developing vehicle technology will likely change driving more in the next five years than it has changed in the previous fifty, and understanding how drivers will respond to these changes is critical," said Guest Editor John D. Lee. "This special issue offers the first collection of papers on highly automated vehicles with a focus on how technology will affect drivers and provides a view into the future of driving."

Further information: http://hfs.sagepub.com/content/54/5.toc?etoc


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. "How will smart cars affect the future of driving?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121005123821.htm>.
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. (2012, October 5). How will smart cars affect the future of driving?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121005123821.htm
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. "How will smart cars affect the future of driving?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121005123821.htm (accessed January 26, 2015).

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