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Early exposure to cigarette smoke leads to greater risk for respiratory disease

Date:
October 15, 2012
Source:
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)
Summary:
New research reveals cigarette smoke adversely affects the developing human airway, especially in prematurity. Fetuses and premature babies exposed to cigarette smoke are at greater risk for developing childhood respiratory diseases, such as asthma.

Research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2012 annual meeting revealed cigarette smoke adversely affects the developing human airway, especially in prematurity. Fetuses and premature babies exposed to cigarette smoke are at greater risk for developing childhood respiratory diseases, such as asthma.

"Due to their highly immature lungs, premature babies often require high levels of additional oxygen in the neonatal intensive care unit, which can put these babies at higher risk for life-long problems with lung diseases," said study author Elizabeth Vogel, M.D., Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

Additional exposure to second-hand smoke in the home often precipitates further respiratory problems and possible return trip(s) to the ICU.

"By examining human fetal airway cells from gestational ages during which rapid airway and lung growth would normally occur, we hope to understand how the developing airway is particularly susceptible to cigarette smoke with the goal of developing interventions to prevent downstream problems such as asthma and bronchopulmonary dysplasia," said Dr. Vogel.

About the Study1 The human fetal airway smooth muscle cells of deceased 18-20 week human fetuses were exposed to various levels of cigarette smoke. Gel analysis was used to determine changes in caveolae and their proteins, cell proliferation and death. Changes in the level of calcium were examined using fluorescent Ca2+ sensitive dyes and real-time microscopic imaging. Cells exposed to cigarette smoke had increased levels of calcium and caveolar proteins, similar to the effects of inflammation in asthma. Even low levels of cigarette smoke increased markers of cell proliferation, while higher smoke levels caused cell death.

These results indicate that the detrimental effects of cigarette smoke are caused, at least in part, by altered caveolar signaling in developing airway smooth muscle cells. Increased caveolar proteins, calcium and cell proliferation can make the airways thicker and more responsive to bronchoconstrictors, thus increasing airway contractility, making it more difficult for the baby to breathe. Such detrimental changes would be only more problematic in premature babies with an immature respiratory system and weak chest walls.

The authors report future studies will rely on a combination of human cell-based work and appropriate animal models to gain a better understanding of how cigarette smoke influences the developing airway.

1Funded by the Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute through a grant to the American Academy of Pediatrics Julius B. Richmond Center.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). "Early exposure to cigarette smoke leads to greater risk for respiratory disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121015131543.htm>.
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). (2012, October 15). Early exposure to cigarette smoke leads to greater risk for respiratory disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121015131543.htm
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). "Early exposure to cigarette smoke leads to greater risk for respiratory disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121015131543.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

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