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Remixed brain waves reveal soundtrack of the human brain

Date:
November 14, 2012
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Scientists have combined and translated two kinds of brain wave recordings into music, transforming one recording (EEG) to create the pitch and duration of a note, and the other (fMRI) to control the intensity of the music. The research reveals an improved method to reflect the physiological processes of the scale-free brain in music.

Scientists have combined and translated two kinds of brain wave recordings into music, transforming one recording (EEG) to create the pitch and duration of a note, and the other (fMRI) to control the intensity of the music.

The research, published Nov. 14 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Jing Lu and colleagues from the University of Electronic Science and Technology, China, reveals an improved method to reflect the physiological processes of the scale-free brain in music.

Previous research published in PLOS ONE by the same group has described how EEG amplitudes and waveforms may be converted to music. In the past, researchers at the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate have also explored the possibility of a form of neuro-training called 'Brain Music', which uses music created from an individual's brain waves to help the individual move from an anxious state to a relaxed state.

This new study uses simultaneous EEG and fMRI recordings to better represent the activity of the brain in musical notes. According to the researchers, this brain music "embodies the workings of the brain as art, providing a platform for scientists and artists to work together to better understand the links between music and the human brain."

The authors also suggest that combining EEG and fMRI data may produce music that better reflects the functional activity of the brain, potentially leading to improvements useful for clinical diagnosis or biofeedback therapy in the future.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jing Lu, Dan Wu, Hua Yang, Cheng Luo, Chaoyi Li, Dezhong Yao. Scale-Free Brain-Wave Music from Simultaneously EEG and fMRI Recordings. PLoS ONE, 2012; 7 (11): e49773 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0049773

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Remixed brain waves reveal soundtrack of the human brain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 November 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121114172823.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2012, November 14). Remixed brain waves reveal soundtrack of the human brain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121114172823.htm
Public Library of Science. "Remixed brain waves reveal soundtrack of the human brain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121114172823.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

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