Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Women eager to negotiate salaries, when given the opportunity

Date:
November 15, 2012
Source:
University of Chicago
Summary:
Although some scholars have suggested that the income gap between men and women is due to women’s reluctance to negotiate salaries, a new study shows that given an invitation, women are just as willing as men to negotiate. Men, however, are more likely to ask for more money when there is no explicit statement in a job description that wages are negotiable.

Although some scholars have suggested that the income gap between men and women is due to women's reluctance to negotiate salaries, a new study at the University of Chicago shows that given an invitation, women are just as willing as men to negotiate for more pay.

Related Articles


Men, however, are more likely than women to ask for more money when there is no explicit statement in a job description that wages are negotiable, the study showed.

"We find that simple manipulations of the contract environment can significantly shift the gender composition of the applicant pool," said UChicago economist John List, the Homer J. Livingston Professor in Economics.

List was a co-author of a paper based on a study of people responding to job advertisements in which salaries were either advertised as negotiable or fixed. Women were three times more likely to apply for jobs with negotiable salaries and to pursue negotiations once they applied, the study found.

Among those responding to an explicit salary offer, 8 percent of women and 11 percent of men initiated salary negotiations. When the salary was described as negotiable, 24 percent of women and 22 percent of men stated salary discussions.

"By merely adding the information that the wage is 'negotiable,' we successfully reduced the gender gap in applications by approximately 45 percent," said List.

Previous studies have shown that men are nine times more likely than women to ask for more money when applying for a job, but this paper is the first to use a field experiment to look at gender differences in the way men and women approach salary negotiations.

List, a leading scholar of using field experiments to study important economic issues, conducted the study with Andreas Leibbrandt, a senior lecturer at Monash University in Australia and a former postdoctoral fellow in UChicago's Department of Economics. The two presented their findings in "Do Women Avoid Salary Negotiations? Evidence from a Large Scale Natural Field Experiment," published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Researchers placed 18 online job ads for administrative assistants in nine major metropolitan areas in the United States from November 2011 through February 2012. The jobs were either for a gender-neutral position in fundraising or for positions in a sports environment -- a situation that prompted more male applicants. They offered jobs to applicants, and eventually 10 people were hired.

After posting the jobs, they received interest from 2,422 people and were able to determine the gender of 2,382 by referring to references that sort first names according to gender. Two-thirds of the job seekers were women.

After expressing an interest in the jobs, applicants were randomly told that the jobs paid $17.60 hourly, or that the salaries were negotiable. Job-related conversations were conducted via email.

The study found that when men determined that salary was fixed, their probability of applying was 47 percent, compared with 32 percent for women. When salary was negotiable, the probability of women applying increased to 33 percent, whereas men's probability decreased to 42 percent.

Despite efforts to promote gender equality, women make about three-fourths as much as men, surveys have shown. Additionally, women hold only 2.5 percent of the highest paid jobs in American firms. The gap in wages begins when a person is hired, so encouraging negotiations from the beginning is likely to have a long-term impact on salary, List said.

A variety of factors may explain the gender differences in salary, including negotiations after a person is hired and differences in women's willingness to negotiate for jobs other than the ones advertised, the paper concluded.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Chicago. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Chicago. "Women eager to negotiate salaries, when given the opportunity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 November 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121115132355.htm>.
University of Chicago. (2012, November 15). Women eager to negotiate salaries, when given the opportunity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121115132355.htm
University of Chicago. "Women eager to negotiate salaries, when given the opportunity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121115132355.htm (accessed November 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Your Complicated Job Might Keep Your Brain Young

Your Complicated Job Might Keep Your Brain Young

Newsy (Nov. 20, 2014) Researchers at the University of Edinburgh found the more complex your job is, the sharper your cognitive skills will likely be as you age. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
100-Year-Old Woman Sees Ocean for First Time

100-Year-Old Woman Sees Ocean for First Time

AP (Nov. 20, 2014) Ruby Holt spent most of her 100 years on a farm in rural Tennessee, picking cotton and raising four children. She saw the ocean for the first time thanks to her assisted living center and a group that grants wishes to the elderly. (Nov. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins