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Lovers' hearts beat in sync

Date:
February 13, 2013
Source:
University of California, Davis
Summary:
When modern-day crooner Trey Songz sings, "Cause girl, my heart beats for you," in his romantic ballad, "Flatline," his lyrics could be telling a tale that's as much physiological as it is emotional, according to a new study that found lovers' hearts indeed beat for each other, or at least at the same rate.

Concept. Researchers found that couples connected to monitors measuring heart rates and respiration get their heart rate in sync, and they breathe in and out at the same intervals.
Credit: Sergey Nivens / Fotolia

When modern-day crooner Trey Songz sings, "Cause girl, my heart beats for you," in his romantic ballad, "Flatline," his lyrics could be telling a tale that's as much physiological as it is emotional, according to a University of California, Davis, study that found lovers' hearts indeed beat for each other, or at least at the same rate.

Emilio Ferrer, a UC Davis psychology professor who has conducted a series of studies on couples in romantic relationships, found that couples connected to monitors measuring heart rates and respiration get their heart rate in sync, and they breathe in and out at the same intervals.

To collect the data, the researchers conducted a series of exercises, sitting 32 heterosexual couples a few feet away from each other in a quiet, calm room. The couples did not speak or touch.

"We've seen a lot of research that one person in a relationship can experience what the other person is experiencing emotionally, but this study shows they also share experiences at a physiological level," Ferrer said.

The couples, in one of the exercises, were asked to sit across from each other and mimic each other, but still not speak, and researchers collected very similar results.

The researchers also mixed up the data from the couples. When the two individuals were not from the same couple, their hearts did not show synchrony, nor did their breathing closely match.

Additionally, both partners showed similar patterns of heart rate and respiration, but women tended to adjust theirs to their partners more. This was true not only for physiological but for day-to-day emotional experiences as well.

"In other words, we found that women adjust in relationship to their partners," said Jonathan Helm, a UC Davis psychology doctoral student and primary author of the study. "Her heart rate is linked to her partner's. I think it means women have a strong link to their partners -- perhaps more empathy."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California, Davis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Jonathan L. Helm, David Sbarra, Emilio Ferrer. Assessing cross-partner associations in physiological responses via coupled oscillator models.. Emotion, 2012; 12 (4): 748 DOI: 10.1037/a0025036
  2. Emilio Ferrer, Jonathan L. Helm. Dynamical systems modeling of physiological coregulation in dyadic interactions. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 2012; DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2012.10.013

Cite This Page:

University of California, Davis. "Lovers' hearts beat in sync." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213093220.htm>.
University of California, Davis. (2013, February 13). Lovers' hearts beat in sync. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213093220.htm
University of California, Davis. "Lovers' hearts beat in sync." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213093220.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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