Science News
from research organizations

Social capital -- the benefit of Facebook 'friends'

Date:
February 21, 2013
Source:
Taylor & Francis
Summary:
Intense Facebook usage is found to have a positive effect on psychological well-being, according to a new study. 
Share:
       
FULL STORY

Intense Facebook usage is found to have a positive effect on psychological well-being, according to a new study..

A recent study in Behaviour & Information Technology investigated the role Facebook use plays in the creation or maintenance of social capital among 800 students from 7 universities in South Africa.

Empirical research has linked social capital to many positives in society, such as improved mental and physical health and economic well-being.

The study suggests a strong association between the intensity of Facebook use and perceived bridging, bonding and maintaining of social capital. Facebook usage was also found to interact with measures of psychological well-being, suggesting that it might be beneficial to students experiencing low self-esteem and low life satisfaction.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Taylor & Francis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kevin Johnston, Maureen Tanner, Nishant Lalla, Dori Kawalski. Social capital: the benefit of Facebook ‘friends’. Behaviour & Information Technology, 2013; 32 (1): 24 DOI: 10.1080/0144929X.2010.550063

Cite This Page:

Taylor & Francis. "Social capital -- the benefit of Facebook 'friends'." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130221084618.htm>.
Taylor & Francis. (2013, February 21). Social capital -- the benefit of Facebook 'friends'. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130221084618.htm
Taylor & Francis. "Social capital -- the benefit of Facebook 'friends'." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130221084618.htm (accessed May 29, 2015).

Share This Page: