Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sampling of embryonic DNA after IVF without biopsy

Date:
April 2, 2013
Source:
Elsevier
Summary:
A new shows that fluid-filled cavity in 5-day old human blastocysts may contain DNA from the embryo, allowing diagnosis of genetic disease without a biopsy. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) technologies allow identification of genetic disorders in human preimplantation embryos after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and before the embryo is transferred back to the patient. This technique allows couples with a high-risk of passing on inherited diseases, to increase their chances of having a healthy baby.

New study published in Reproductive Biomedicine Online shows that fluid-filled cavity in 5-day old human blastocysts may contain DNA from the embryo, allowing diagnosis of genetic disease without a biopsy.

Related Articles


Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) technologies allow identification of genetic disorders in human preimplantation embryos after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and before the embryo is transferred back to the patient. This technique allows couples with a high-risk of passing on inherited diseases, to increase their chances of having a healthy baby. Despite the theoretical benefits of PGD, clinical outcomes using these technologies vary, possibly because of the need to remove one or more cells from the embryo using biopsy.

In a recent study published in Reproductive Biomedicine Online, a group of researchers from Italy and the United Kingdom sought to achieve diagnose of genetic disease in embryonic DNA without the use of a biopsy. By extracting fluid from human embryos at the blastocyst stage they found that it contains DNA from the embryo. Blastocysts are 5 or 6 day old embryos and are at the last free-living stage that can be studied in the laboratory prior to transfer into the uterus. They contain between 50 and 300 cells that surround a fluid-filled cavity called the blastocoels. The researchers carefully removed fluid from the blastocoel, leaving the cells intact; the sampled blastocysts were subsequently cryopreserved. Analysis of this fluid showed that it contained cell-free DNA in a state good enough to determine several known genes of the sex chromosomes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); whole genome amplification and followed by analysis using a specialized tool for genetic testing called a DNA microarray were also used and revealed whether the embryos had a normal number of chromosomes -- chromosome abnormalities are one of the main causes of miscarriage and failure of embryos to form pregnancies during IVF treatments.

"This is the first time that embryonic DNA has been detected in the human blastocyst without the use of biopsy," explained lead researchers Dr. Simone Palini Ph.D., from the IVF Unit at Cervesi Hospital in Cattolica, Italy and Dr. Galluzzi from University of Urbino in Italy and Dr. Dagan Wells from University of Oxford, United Kingdom.

"This is a technique that most embryologists can easily master," Dr. Buletti who directs the IVF team at Cervesi Hospital Cattolica and Prof. Magnani, Chairman of the Department of Biomolecular Sciences of the University of Urbino, added. "More work needs to be done to confirm our results, but we hope that this approach will ultimately help infertile couples achieve their dream of having a family. It may also improve the options for families affected by severe inherited conditions, helping them to have healthy babies."

"Even though it is only a preliminary finding, this approach may allow for genetic testing of the embryo without the complexity of cell sampling," Dr. Joe Leigh Simpson MD, Senior Vice President for Research Programs, March of Dimes Foundation and President, International Federation of Fertility Societies (IFFS), a pioneer in reproductive medicine and genetics, commented on the research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Elsevier. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Palini, L. Galluzzi, S. De Stefani, M. Bianchi, D. Wells, M. Magnani, C. Bulletti. Genomic DNA in human blastocoele fluid. Reproductive BioMedicine Online, 2013; DOI: 10.1016/j.rbmo.2013.02.012

Cite This Page:

Elsevier. "Sampling of embryonic DNA after IVF without biopsy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402091140.htm>.
Elsevier. (2013, April 2). Sampling of embryonic DNA after IVF without biopsy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402091140.htm
Elsevier. "Sampling of embryonic DNA after IVF without biopsy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130402091140.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) — Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins