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U.S. children born outside the United States have lower risk of allergic disease

Date:
April 29, 2013
Source:
American Medical Association (AMA)
Summary:
A new study suggests children living the in the United States but born outside the U.S. have a lower prevalence of allergic disease that increases after residing in the United States for one decade.
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A study by Jonathan I. Silverberg, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., of St. Luke's -- Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, and colleagues suggests children living the in the United States but born outside the U.S. have a lower prevalence of allergic disease that increases after residing in the United States for one decade.

The cross-sectional questionnaire used for the study was distributed to 91,642 children aged 0 to 17 years enrolled in the 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health. The main outcomes measured were prevalence of allergic disease, including asthma, eczema, hay fever, and food allergies.

According to the study results, children born outside the United States had significantly lower odds of any atopic disorders than those born in the United States, including ever-asthma, current-asthma, eczema, hay fever, and food allergies. Children born outside of the United States whose parents were also born outside the United States had significantly lower odds of any atopic disorders than those whose parents were born in the United States. Children born outside the United States who lived in the United States for longer than 10 years when compared with those who resided for only 0 to 2 years had significantly higher odds of developing any allergic disorders, including eczema and hay fever, but not asthma or food allergies.

"In conclusion, foreign-born Americans have significantly lower risk of allergic disease than US-born Americans. However, foreign-born Americans develop increased risk for allergic disease with prolonged residence in the United States," the study concludes.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Medical Association (AMA). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jonathan I. Silverberg, Eric L. Simpson, Helen G. Durkin, Rauno Joks. Prevalence of Allergic Disease in Foreign-Born American Children. Jama Pediatrics, April 29, 2013 DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.1319

Cite This Page:

American Medical Association (AMA). "U.S. children born outside the United States have lower risk of allergic disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130429164630.htm>.
American Medical Association (AMA). (2013, April 29). U.S. children born outside the United States have lower risk of allergic disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130429164630.htm
American Medical Association (AMA). "U.S. children born outside the United States have lower risk of allergic disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130429164630.htm (accessed September 3, 2015).

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