Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

What makes people click on news stories -- not terms like public affairs or politics

Date:
June 18, 2013
Source:
University of Bristol
Summary:
A new study has analyzed tens of thousands of articles available to readers of online news and created a model to find out 'what makes people click.'

A new study has analysed tens of thousands of articles available to readers of online news and created a model to find out 'what makes people click'.

The researchers developed a model of "news appeal" based on the words contained in an article's title and text intro, which is what a reader uses when they choose to click on a story.

The study by academics at the University of Bristol's Intelligent Systems Laboratory is published in a series of publications.

The aim of the study was to model the reading preferences for the audiences of 14 online news outlets using machine learning techniques. The models, describing the appeal of an article to each audience, were developed by linear functions of word frequencies. The models compared articles that became "most popular" on a given day in a given outlet with articles that did not.

The research, led by Nello Cristianini, Professor of Artificial Intelligence, identified the most attractive keywords, as well as the least attractive ones, and explained the choices readers made.

The team created a model for each user group they had data on, including the BBC's online news, Forbes and Australian newspapers.

After scoring articles by reader preferences, the researchers then ranked the articles by their appeal, and studied what might explain the choices made by online readers.

Professor Cristianini, speaking about the research, said: "We found significant inverse correlations between the appeal to users and the amount of attention devoted to public affairs.

"People are put off by public affairs and attracted by entertainment, crime, and other non-public affairs topics."

The researchers examined millions of article pairs, collected over nearly eighteen months. The models analysed user choices, choices were then used to compare both the audiences and the contents of various news outlets.

The researchers found that there is a significant correlation between the demographic profiles of audiences and their preferences. They also found that content appeal is related both to writing style -- with more sentimentally charged language being preferred, and to content with "public affairs" topics, such as "finance" and "politics," being less preferred.

Further information about the study, together with word clouds of the most popular words for readers of Forbes magazine and the Australian website "news.com.au" is available at mediapatterns.enm.bris.ac.uk/WhatReadersWant

Article: Modelling and explaining online news preferences, Elena Hensinger, Ilias Flaounas, Nello Cristianini, In Collection: Pattern Recognition -- Applications and Methods, Springer Berlin Heidelberg.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Bristol. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Elena Hensinger, Ilias Flaounas, Nello Cristianini. Modelling and Explaining Online News Preferences. Pattern Recognition - Applications and Methods Advances in Intelligent and Soft Computing, 2013 DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-36530-0_6

Cite This Page:

University of Bristol. "What makes people click on news stories -- not terms like public affairs or politics." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 June 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130618113848.htm>.
University of Bristol. (2013, June 18). What makes people click on news stories -- not terms like public affairs or politics. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130618113848.htm
University of Bristol. "What makes people click on news stories -- not terms like public affairs or politics." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130618113848.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Study On Artists' Brain Shows They're 'Structurally Unique'

Study On Artists' Brain Shows They're 'Structurally Unique'

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The brains of artists aren't really left-brain or right-brain, but rather have extra neural matter in visual and motor control areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) A recent study links apathetic feelings to a smaller brain. Researchers say the results indicate a need for apathy screening for at-risk seniors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are School Dress Codes Too Strict?

Are School Dress Codes Too Strict?

AP (Apr. 16, 2014) Pushing the limits on style and self-expression is a rite of passage for teens and even younger kids. How far should schools go with their dress codes? The courts have sided with schools in an era when school safety is paramount. (April 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins