Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Your primary school language reveals if you move away or stay behind

Date:
July 9, 2013
Source:
University of Copenhagen
Summary:
The way you speak in primary school reveals if you will stay behind in your native part of the country or head for the big city to get an education, according to new research.

The way you speak in primary school reveals if you will stay behind in your native part of the country or head for the big city to get an education. This is one of the conclusions in University of Copenhagen linguist Malene Monka's new PhD thesis.

"My research shows that young people, who end up moving away from their native area to seek an education and career elsewhere, change the way they speak already in their early youth. They speak less dialect than comparable peers at the same age," Malene Monka from LANCHART at University of Copenhagen explains.

During the late 70's and 80's, a group of Danish linguists conducted interviews with a large group of informants who were finishing primary school. Now, together with a colleague from The University of Southern Denmark, Malene Monka has re-interviewed the same informants.

She compared six mobile informants (that is, people who have moved away) with a group of informants that have stayed behind in their native area. Subsequently, she analyzed and compared a large number of different dialectal traits in the new and the old interviews. Her research has been conducted in three different municipalities in three different parts of Denmark.

Standard Danish is the language of the school

The language comparison of the mobile and the settled informants showed that there was a big difference in the spoken language of the two groups of informants -- even long before the mobile informants had moved to the city. The informants were of the same age, sex and social class and still the difference was significant.

"When I started finding the dialect traits, it became clear that the ones that would eventually move away spoke less dialect while they were living in their native area. Even though they had precisely the same background as the informants who stayed behind. Linguistically you prepare to move long before your mind is aware of it, Malene Monka says and offers an explanation of the phenomenon:

"The, maybe somewhat boring, explanation is that the Danish school system is made for standard Danish. If you want to make it in the educational system, you need to speak standard Danish. It permeates the language society and you do not even need to be aware of what you are doing. Standard Danish is the language of the school."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Copenhagen. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Copenhagen. "Your primary school language reveals if you move away or stay behind." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130709115355.htm>.
University of Copenhagen. (2013, July 9). Your primary school language reveals if you move away or stay behind. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130709115355.htm
University of Copenhagen. "Your primary school language reveals if you move away or stay behind." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130709115355.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) More and more studies are showing positive benefits to playing video games, but the jury is still out on brain training programs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Your Spouse's Personality May Influence Your Earnings

Your Spouse's Personality May Influence Your Earnings

Newsy (Sep. 26, 2014) Research from Washington University suggest people with conscientious spouses have greater career success. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can A Blood Test Predict Psychosis Risk?

Can A Blood Test Predict Psychosis Risk?

Newsy (Sep. 26, 2014) Researchers say certain markers in the blood can predict risk of psychosis later in the life. The test can aid in early treatment for the condition. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Harpist Soothes Gorillas, Orangutans With Music

Harpist Soothes Gorillas, Orangutans With Music

AP (Sep. 25, 2014) Teri Tacheny, a harpist, has a loyal following of fans who appreciate her soothing music. Every month, gorillas, orangutans and monkeys amble down to hear her play at the Como Park Zoo in Minnesota. (Sept. 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins