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Evaluating medical research: New treatments better than standard ones just over half the time

Date:
August 27, 2013
Source:
University of South Florida (USF Health)
Summary:
Scientists report that on average new treatments work better than existing ones just over half the time. And, from an ethical and scientific perspective, that's evidence that the randomized controlled trial system is working, they say.

USF Distinguished Professor Benjamin Djulbegovic, MD, PhD, has studied the ethics of randomized clinical trials and their effectiveness in evaluating the outcomes of new treatments for decades.

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Now, in a paper published Aug. 22 in the top journal Nature, Dr. Djulbegovic and colleagues report that on average new treatments work better than existing ones just over half the time. On scientific and ethical grounds, they say, the randomized controlled trial (RCT) system's little more than 50-50 success rate over the past half century is evidence that the system is working as intended.

The researchers analyzed 860 phase III published and unpublished RCTs performed by academic institutions or pharmaceutical companies. These trials collectively involved more than 350,000 patients.

"Our retrospective review of more than 50 years of randomized trials shows that they remain the 'indispensable ordeals' through which biomedical researchers' responsibility to patients and the public is manifested," the researchers conclude. "These trials may need tweak and polish, but they're not broken."

People who consent to participate RCTs are willing to be randomly allocated to new or existing treatments. While RCTs are considered the gold standard for comparing the effects of one treatment to another, the gradual progress they yield can seem frustratingly slow -- particularly for patients with poor standard treatment options.

Yet, the genuine uncertainty associated with individual RCTs has been vital to the gains in therapeutics, said Dr. Djulbegovic, professor of medicine and oncology at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine and Moffitt Cancer Center. If there was significant likelihood that one treatment in a comparison was better than the other, it would be unethical to deny some patients the superior treatment, and well-informed patients would probably refuse to participate in the study, he said.

Incremental advances in treatment generated by RCTs over time -- such as childhood leukemia cure rates moving from zero to 80 percent even though only 2 to 5 percent of new treatments provided a breakthrough -- have translated into important improvements in health and lifespan, the authors say. However, they suggest trials could still benefit from more rigorous design, implementation and reporting -with widespread publication of trial results, including negative findings.

The Nature paper is one of a series of publications that Dr. Djulbegovic and colleagues have authored this year (25 so far), including a clinical therapeutics case study in the New England Journal of Medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of South Florida (USF Health). The original article was written by Anne DeLotto Baier. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Benjamin Djulbegovic, Ambuj Kumar, Paul Glasziou, Branko Miladinovic, Iain Chalmers. Medical research: Trial unpredictability yields predictable therapy gains. Nature, 2013; 500 (7463): 395 DOI: 10.1038/500395a

Cite This Page:

University of South Florida (USF Health). "Evaluating medical research: New treatments better than standard ones just over half the time." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130827122917.htm>.
University of South Florida (USF Health). (2013, August 27). Evaluating medical research: New treatments better than standard ones just over half the time. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130827122917.htm
University of South Florida (USF Health). "Evaluating medical research: New treatments better than standard ones just over half the time." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130827122917.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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