Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Public says childhood cancer should be top children's health research priority

Date:
September 23, 2013
Source:
University of Michigan Health System
Summary:
Adults across the U.S. rate childhood cancer as their top priority for research into improving children’s health, according to a new poll.

Diabetes, birth defects and causes of infant death also rank high, according to U-M’s National Poll on Children’s Health.
Credit: C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health

Adults across the U.S. rate childhood cancer as their top priority for research into improving children's health, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health.

Related Articles


September is National Childhood Cancer Awareness month, and in this latest poll, 76 percent of adults rated research into childhood cancers as "very important." That was followed by diabetes, with 70 percent rating it "very important" and birth defects or other genetic problems with 68 percent. "So many people know a child or family touched by childhood cancer," says Matthew M. Davis, M.D., M.A.P.P., director of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. "It remains a leading killer of children under 18 in the United States. The public clearly ranks research into cures and treatments for these often deadly cancers as a top priority."

Over the last several decades, research has made strong advances toward improving cure rates for children's cancers. Overall cure rates have increased from less than 40 to nearly 70 percent. But each year, more than 13,000 parents learn their child has cancer, and one of out of five children diagnosed does not survive.

"The results of this poll seem to indicate our research community is in tune with what the public sees as a top priority. But in a national research funding climate that is under pressure, this measurement of the public's priorities can help government agencies and others set strategies for the best use of research funding," says Davis, who also is professor of pediatrics and internal medicine at the U-M Medical School and professor of public policy at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy.

The remaining top 10 rankings, following the top three categories of childhood cancers, diabetes and birth defects/other genetic problems were:

4. Causes of infant deaths

5. Transplants for cancers and other diseases

6. Safety of medications

7. Heart problems

8. Safety of vaccines

9. Improving quality of health care

10. Obesity

Poll data also showed that those parents with at least one child in the house under 18 years old rated childhood cancers first, but they ranked safety of vaccines and safety of medications higher than the overall group. Results also varied for adults from different racial/ethnic backgrounds. African-Americans rated diabetes the highest child health research priority, with 87 percent rating it "very important." They also rated sickle cell and blood diseases higher than the overall group. Hispanics rated childhood cancer first, but causes of infant death came in second, ahead of diabetes. "This poll provides guidance for the research road ahead and the path to healthier lives for children and adults," Davis says. "This information can be an important tool in determining research strategies, because the investments made today in the lab will make the difference in the lives of children tomorrow."

See the video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgZQ0bZy61E&feature=youtu.be

The full report is available online at:http://mottnpch.org/reports-surveys/top-public-priorities-children%E2%80%99s-health-research-cancer-diabetes-birth-defects


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Michigan Health System. "Public says childhood cancer should be top children's health research priority." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 September 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130923114019.htm>.
University of Michigan Health System. (2013, September 23). Public says childhood cancer should be top children's health research priority. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130923114019.htm
University of Michigan Health System. "Public says childhood cancer should be top children's health research priority." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130923114019.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 29, 2014) A Swedish amputee who became the first person to ever receive a brain controlled prosthetic arm is able to manipulate and handle delicate objects with an unprecedented level of dexterity. The device is connected directly to his bone, nerves and muscles, giving him the ability to control it with his thoughts. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) Google X wants to improve modern medicine with nanoparticles and a wearable device. It's all an attempt to tackle disease detection and prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Drinking Milk Lead To Early Death?

Can Drinking Milk Lead To Early Death?

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) Researchers in Sweden released a study showing heavy milk drinkers face an increased mortality risk from a variety of causes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: The US Will Not 'run and Hide' From Ebola

Obama: The US Will Not 'run and Hide' From Ebola

AP (Oct. 29, 2014) Surrounded by health care workers in the White House East Room, President Barack Obama said the U.S. will likely see additional Ebola cases in the weeks ahead. But he said the nation can't seal itself off in the fight against the disease. (Oct. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins