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Engine technology on the road to meeting emissions standards

Date:
October 16, 2013
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
An engine design appearing under the hoods of many new cars and light trucks today is close to meeting the latest pollution standards that will require vehicles to emit fewer harmful particles over their lifetimes, scientists are reporting.

An engine design appearing under the hoods of many new cars and light trucks today is close to meeting the latest pollution standards that will require vehicles to emit fewer harmful particles over their lifetimes, scientists are reporting. The new study on emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) technology appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Matti Maricq and colleagues explain that to meet new regulations, vehicle manufacturers need to make cars both more fuel-efficient and less polluting, which can be a difficult engineering challenge. In 2012, California approved standards to reduce emissions from passenger cars to 3 milligrams, or a millionth of an ounce, per mile over the 2017-2021 automobile model years. Particulate matter in emissions is associated with health problems, such as asthma and other lung conditions.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the same target and expects it to remain consistent for 150,000 miles of a vehicle's lifetime. In the meantime, car manufacturers have been putting more cars with GDI technology, which boosts fuel efficiency by injecting gasoline straight into a vehicle's combustion chamber, on the market. But no one had looked at the emissions picture over the lifetime of these fuel-efficient vehicles to see if GDI cars can also meet the new particulate matter standards.

They tested the particle emissions from two GDI vehicles. They found in these examples that the emissions hovered near or below the limit set by the new California and EPA standards over a lifetime of 150,000 miles.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. M. Matti Maricq, Joseph J. Szente, Jack Adams, Paul Tennison, Todd Rumpsa. Influence of Mileage Accumulation on the Particle Mass and Number Emissions of Two Gasoline Direct Injection Vehicles. Environmental Science & Technology, 2013; 47 (20): 11890 DOI: 10.1021/es402686z

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Engine technology on the road to meeting emissions standards." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131016112809.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2013, October 16). Engine technology on the road to meeting emissions standards. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131016112809.htm
American Chemical Society. "Engine technology on the road to meeting emissions standards." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131016112809.htm (accessed April 23, 2014).

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