Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

A step towards early Alzheimer's diagnosis

Date:
October 23, 2013
Source:
Linköping University
Summary:
If Alzheimer's disease is to be treated in the future, it requires an early diagnosis, which is not yet possible. Now researchers at higher education institutions have identified six proteins in spinal fluid that can be used as markers for the illness.

Most researchers now agree that one cause of the illness is toxic accumulations – plaques – of the beta amyloid protein. In a healthy brain, the cells are cleansed of such surplus products through lysosomes, the cells’ “waste disposal facilities” (green in the picture).
Credit: Linköping University

Alzheimer's causes great suffering and has a one hundred percent fatality rate. The breakdown of brain cells has been in progress for ten years or more by the time symptoms begin to appear. Currently there is no treatment that can stop the process.

Most researchers now agree that one cause of the illness is toxic accumulations -- plaques -- of the beta amyloid protein. In a healthy brain, the cells are cleansed of such surplus products through lysosomes, the cells' "waste disposal facilities"

"In victims of Alzheimer's, something happens to the lysosomes so that they can't manage to take care of the surplus of beta amyloid. They fill up with junk that normally is broken down into its component parts and recycled," says Katarina Kågedal, reader in Experimental Pathology at Linköping University. She led the study that is now being published in Neuromolecular Medicine.

The researchers' hypothesis was that these changes in the brain's lysosomal network could be reflected in the spinal fluid, which surrounds the brain's various parts and drains down into the spinal column. They studied samples of spinal marrow from 20 Alzheimer's patients and an equal number of healthy control subjects. The screening was aimed at 35 proteins that are associated with the lysosomal network.

"Six of these had clearly increased in the patients; none of them were previously known as markers for Alzheimer's," says Kågedal.

Her hope is that the group's discovery will contribute to early diagnoses of the illness, which is necessary in the first stage in order to be able to begin reliable clinical tests of candidates for drugs. But perhaps the six lysosomal proteins could also be "drug targets" -- targets for developing drugs.

"It may be a question of strengthening protection against plaque formation or reactivating the lysosomes so that they manage to break down the plaque," Kågedal says.

The study was conducted on 20 anonymized, archived spinal marrow samples and the results were confirmed afterwards on an independent range of samples of equal size. All samples were provided by the Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry at Sahlgrenska University Hospital.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Linköping University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Andrea Armstrong, Niklas Mattsson, Hanna Appelqvist, Camilla Janefjord, Linnea Sandin, Lotta Agholme, Bob Olsson, Samuel Svensson, Kaj Blennow, Henrik Zetterberg, Katarina Kågedal. Lysosomal Network Proteins as Potential Novel CSF Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease. NeuroMolecular Medicine, 2013; DOI: 10.1007/s12017-013-8269-3

Cite This Page:

Linköping University. "A step towards early Alzheimer's diagnosis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023112632.htm>.
Linköping University. (2013, October 23). A step towards early Alzheimer's diagnosis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023112632.htm
Linköping University. "A step towards early Alzheimer's diagnosis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023112632.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) — New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Coffee Then Napping: The (New) Key To Alertness

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) — Researchers say having a cup of coffee then taking a nap is more effective than a nap or coffee alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

AFP (Aug. 29, 2014) — Twenty college-age students are getting 100,000 dollars from a Silicon Valley leader and a chance to live in San Francisco in order to work on the start-up project of their dreams, but they have to quit school first. Duration: 02:20 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Baby Babbling Might Lead To Faster Language Development

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) — A new study suggests babies develop language skills more quickly if their parents imitate the babies' sounds and expressions and talk to them often. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins