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Introducing solid foods while continuing to breast feed could prevent child allergies

Date:
November 20, 2013
Source:
University of Southampton
Summary:
Introducing solid food with breast milk after the 17th week of birth could reduce food allergies in babies, according to research. The research suggests that giving the baby solid food beside breast feeding helps it develop a better, stronger immune system to fight food allergies.

Introducing solid food with breast milk after the 17th week of birth could reduce food allergies in babies, according to University of Southampton research.

The research, led by Dr Kate Grimshaw, dietitian and senior research fellow at the University, say that giving the baby solid food beside breast feeding helps it develop a better, stronger immune system to fight food allergies.

"Introducing solid foods alongside breastfeeding can benefit the immune system," Dr Grimshaw explains. "It appears the immune system becomes educated when there is an overlap of solids and breast milk because the milk promotes tolerogenic mechanisms against the solids.

"Additionally, our findings suggest 17 weeks is a crucial time point, with solid food introduction before this time appearing to promote allergic disease whereas solid food introduction after that time point seems to promote tolerance."

Infants are largely intolerant of solid food before four to six months of age. This is thought to be due to the infant gut being relatively immature, which may cause symptoms of food allergy.

The study, funded by the UK Food Standards Agency and published in Paediatrics, recruited 1140 infants at birth from the Hampshire area in a study known as 'PIFA'. 41 of these children went onto to develop a food allergy by the time they were two years of age. The diet of these infants was compared with the diet of 82 infants who did not develop food allergy by the time they were two.

The team found that children who had developed allergies began eating solid food earlier than children with no allergies -- roughly, at age 16 weeks or earlier. Children with allergies were also more likely to not be being breastfed when the mother introduced cow's milk protein, from any source. Women who are not breastfeeding are encouraged to introduce solids after 17 weeks of age, Dr Grimshaw says.

This unique research supports the recommendations of the American Academy of Paediatrics and the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition who urge mothers not to introduce solid foods before four to six months of age. Furthermore the findings also support the American Academy of Paediatrics' breastfeeding recommendations that breastfeeding should continue while solid foods are introduced into the diet.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Southampton. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. K. E. C. Grimshaw, J. Maskell, E. M. Oliver, R. C. G. Morris, K. D. Foote, E. N. C. Mills, G. Roberts, B. M. Margetts. Introduction of Complementary Foods and the Relationship to Food Allergy. PEDIATRICS, 2013; 132 (6): e1529 DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-3692

Cite This Page:

University of Southampton. "Introducing solid foods while continuing to breast feed could prevent child allergies." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131120103510.htm>.
University of Southampton. (2013, November 20). Introducing solid foods while continuing to breast feed could prevent child allergies. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131120103510.htm
University of Southampton. "Introducing solid foods while continuing to breast feed could prevent child allergies." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131120103510.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

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