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First Class 1 evidence for cognitive rehabilitation in MS

Date:
November 21, 2013
Source:
Kessler Foundation
Summary:
Researchers published the results of the MEMREHAB Trial, providing the first Class I evidence for the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis.

Kessler Foundation researchers published the results of the MEMREHAB Trial in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, providing the first Class I evidence for the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis (MS).

Although disabling cognitive problems that affect functional performance and employment are common in persons with MS, there are very few evidence-based protocols for cognitive rehabilitation in MS. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is the first to include both objective (investigator administered) and subjective measures (patient and family self-report). Investigators looked at the impact of the modified Story Memory Technique (mSMT) on learning and memory in 86 participants with MS with documented memory deficits (41 mSMT group, 45 placebo). Not only did objective measures improve, patients and families reported improvements in daily function in everyday life -- improvements that had a positive impact on satisfaction with life and everyday contentment.

"Our results show that cognitive rehabilitation works," said Nancy Chiaravalloti, Ph.D., director of Neuroscience & Neuropsychology Research at Kessler Foundation, "and moreover, the effects of the 10-session protocol persisted for six months." a unique aspect of the protocol is the inclusion of 2 sessions that focus on translating cognitive strategies to daily life. Neuroimaging results that were collected in a subset of patients were published in the Journal of Neurology in 2012.

The two studies are being used to support reimbursement for cognitive rehabilitation. "RCTs are essential to demonstrating to third party payers that cognitive rehabilitation should be a reimbursable intervention," commented John DeLuca, Ph.D., VP of Research & Training at Kessler Foundation. "Behavioral intervention should be available for persons with MS who have memory deficits. Without reimbursement, however, few clinicians will use it and few patients will benefit."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Kessler Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Chiaravalloti N, Moore NB, Nikelshpur OM, DeLuca D. An RCT to treat learning impairment in MS. Neurology, November 2013

Cite This Page:

Kessler Foundation. "First Class 1 evidence for cognitive rehabilitation in MS." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131121135637.htm>.
Kessler Foundation. (2013, November 21). First Class 1 evidence for cognitive rehabilitation in MS. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131121135637.htm
Kessler Foundation. "First Class 1 evidence for cognitive rehabilitation in MS." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131121135637.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

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