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Dual protein knockout could lead to new male contraceptive

Date:
December 3, 2013
Source:
Monash University
Summary:
A new male contraceptive could be on the horizon after scientists identified a novel way to block the transport of sperm during ejaculation.

Pills (stock image). A new male contraceptive could be on the horizon after scientists identified a novel way to block the transport of sperm during ejaculation.
Credit: © nmelnychuk / Fotolia

A new male contraceptive could be on the horizon after scientists identified a novel way to block the transport of sperm during ejaculation.

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Published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science scientists have found that complete male infertility could be achieved by blocking two proteins found on the smooth muscle cells that trigger the transport of sperm.

The researchers demonstrated that the absence of two proteins in mouse models, α1A-adrenoceptor and P2X1-purinoceptor, which mediate sperm transport, caused infertility, without effects on long-term sexual behavior or function.

Lead researchers, Dr Sab Ventura and Dr Carl White of the Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, believe the knowledge could be applied to the potential development of a contraceptive pill for men.

"Previous strategies have focused on hormonal targets or mechanisms that produce dysfunctional sperm incapable of fertilization, but they often interfere with male sexual activity and cause long term irreversible effects on fertility," Dr Ventura said.

"We've shown that simultaneously disrupting the two proteins that control the transport of sperm during ejaculation causes complete male infertility, but without affecting the long-term viability of sperm or the sexual or general health of males. The sperm is effectively there but the muscle is just not receiving the chemical message to move it.

Dr Ventura said there was already a drug that targets one of the two proteins, but they would have to find a chemical and develop a drug to block the second one.

"This suggests a therapeutic target for male contraception. The next step is to look at developing an oral male contraceptive drug, which is effective, safe, and readily reversible."

If successful, it is hoped a male contraceptive pill could be available within ten years.

Researchers from University of Melbourne and the University of Leicester, UK, collaborated on the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Monash University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. C. W. White, Y.-T. Choong, J. L. Short, B. Exintaris, D. T. Malone, A. M. Allen, R. J. Evans, S. Ventura. Male contraception via simultaneous knockout of  1A-adrenoceptors and P2X1-purinoceptors in mice. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2013; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1318624110

Cite This Page:

Monash University. "Dual protein knockout could lead to new male contraceptive." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131203091637.htm>.
Monash University. (2013, December 3). Dual protein knockout could lead to new male contraceptive. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131203091637.htm
Monash University. "Dual protein knockout could lead to new male contraceptive." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131203091637.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

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