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Intricacy of Comet Lovejoy's tail captured

Date:
December 6, 2013
Source:
Stony Brook University
Summary:
An international team of astronomers has captured an image of the intricate flow of Comet Lovejoy's ion tail.

Comet Lovejoy (C/2013 R1) image by Suprime-Cam on Subaru Telescope, taken on December 3, 2013 in Hawaii Time. Wavelength is at 450 nm (B-band), with 180 seconds exposure.
Credit: NAOJ, data process: Masafumi Yagi (NAOJ)

An international team of astronomers led by Prof. Jin Koda at Stony Brook University used Suprime-Cam, Subaru Telescope's wide-field, prime-focus camera, to capture an image of the intricate flow of Comet Lovejoy's (C/2013 R1) ion tail.

The instrument's combination of a wide field of view and high spatial resolution provides a clear delineation of the complex, wiggling streams in the comet's tail. At the time of this observation, at around 5:30 am on December 3, 2013 (Hawaii Standard Time), Comet Lovejoy was 50 million miles (80 million km) distant from Earth and 80 million miles (130 million km) away from the Sun.

Comet Lovejoy was discovered in September this year (2013). At dawn on October 31, 2013, Subaru Telescope succeeded in capturing its image, which showed dust jets streaming from its nucleus.

Although Comet ISON (C2012 S1) did not survive its closest encounter with the Sun (its perihelion) at the end of November 2013, Comet Lovejoy's visibility has been increasing in the eastern sky. The current image adds even more data about this newly-discovered comet. The variety of approaches used to image and analyze Comet Lovejoy will lead to a much clearer view of its detailed structure.

"Subaru Telescope offers a rare combination of large telescope aperture and a wide-field camera. This enabled us to capture a detailed look at the nucleus while also photogenically framing inner portions of Comet Lovejoy's impressive ion tail," commented a member of the observation team.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Stony Brook University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Stony Brook University. "Intricacy of Comet Lovejoy's tail captured." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131206090943.htm>.
Stony Brook University. (2013, December 6). Intricacy of Comet Lovejoy's tail captured. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131206090943.htm
Stony Brook University. "Intricacy of Comet Lovejoy's tail captured." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131206090943.htm (accessed April 25, 2014).

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