Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Global study reveals gender-based violence vastly underreported

Date:
December 10, 2013
Source:
Stony Brook Medicine
Summary:
Findings from a new global study suggest that estimates of gender-based violence prevalence based on health systems data or on police reports may underestimate the actual total prevalence by 11- to 128-fold.

Findings from a new global study suggest that estimates of gender-based violence (GBV) prevalence based on health systems data or on police reports may underestimate the actual total prevalence by 11- to 128-fold. Led by Tia Palermo, PhD, Assistant Professor in Public Health and the Department of Preventive Medicine at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, the study is soon to be published online in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

In the paper, titled "Tip of the Iceberg: Reporting and Gender-Based Violence in Developing Countries," the researchers analyzed data from Demographic and Health Surveys from 24 countries, which revealed 93,656 women as survivors of GBV. They found that only 7 percent of women globally who are survivors of physical or sexual violence report GBV to formal sources, including legal, medical, or social support services. Additionally, disclosure of GBV to family, friends, or neighbors of the victims was low (37 percent). In 20 of the 24 countries studied, the majority of women told no one at all.

"Our results confirm that the vast majority of women who have experienced GBV remain uncounted," said Dr. Palermo. "The research further indicates that not only are most survivors not receiving formal services, but they are not receiving informal support from friends and family members."

Dr. Palermo also said that the overall findings should prompt the establishment of "one-stop" centers for GBV survivors; build community and country-based efforts to reduce the stigma of such violence; and increase local dissemination of information on available services to GBV survivors, particularly in rural areas and to young women.

The study is the largest multi-country comparison conducted to date on GBV reporting.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Stony Brook Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Palermo, T, J Bleck, and Amber Peterman. Tip of the iceberg: Reporting and gender-based violence in developing countries. American Journal of Epidemiology, December 2013

Cite This Page:

Stony Brook Medicine. "Global study reveals gender-based violence vastly underreported." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131210172446.htm>.
Stony Brook Medicine. (2013, December 10). Global study reveals gender-based violence vastly underreported. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131210172446.htm
Stony Brook Medicine. "Global study reveals gender-based violence vastly underreported." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131210172446.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Do More Wedding Guests Make A Happier Marriage?

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) A new study found couples who had at least 150 guests at their weddings were more likely to report being happy in their marriages. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape

Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape

AP (Aug. 20, 2014) Nine years after Hurricane Katrina, charter schools are the new reality of public education in New Orleans. The state of Louisiana took over most of the city's public schools after the killer storm in 2005. (Aug. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Kids' Drawings At Age 4 Linked To Intelligence At Age 14

Kids' Drawings At Age 4 Linked To Intelligence At Age 14

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) A study by King's College London says there's a link between how well kids draw at age 4 and how intelligent they are later in life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins