Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

World's tiniest drug cabinets could be attached to cancerous cells for long term treatment

Date:
January 14, 2014
Source:
University of Copenhagen
Summary:
As if being sick weren't bad enough, there's also the fear of frequent injections, side effects and overdosing on you medication. Now medical researchers have shown that reservoirs of anti-viral pharmaceuticals could be manufactured to bind specifically to infected tissue such as cancer cells for the slow concentrated delivery of drug treatments.

As if being sick weren't bad enough, there's also the fear of frequent injections, side effects and overdosing on you medication. Now a team of researchers from University of Copenhagen, Department of Chemistry, Nano- science center and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), have shown that reservoirs of anti-viral pharmaceuticals could be manufactured to bind specifically to infected tissue such as cancer cells for the slow concentrated delivery of drug treatments. The new research is published in ACS Macro Letters.

Smaller doses, less injections and fewer side effects

The findings, from Dr Marité Cárdenas (Copenhagen) and Dr Richard Campbell and Dr Erik Watkins (ILL), came as a result of neutron reflectometry studies at a neutron source in Grenoble, France. They could provide a way to reduce dosages and the frequency of injections administered to patients undergoing a wide variety of treatments, as well as minimising side effects of over-dosing.

Fats and branches hold medicine for longer

The attachment of reservoirs of therapeutic drugs to cell membranes for slow diffusion and continuous delivery inside the cells is a major aim in drug R&D. A promising candidate for packaging up and carrying such concoctions of drugs are a group of self-assembled liquid crystalline particles. Composed of fatty molecules known as phospholipids and tree-like macromolecules called dendrimers which have many branches, the particles form spontaneously and have the capacity to soak up and carry large quantities of drug molecules for prolonged diffusion. They are also known for their ability to bind to cellular membranes.

First treatment close to market

The first treatments using such particles are close to market through products incorporating a similar formulation called Cubosomes (cubic phase nanoparticles). Developed and commercialized by Swedish start-up Camarus Ab, its FluidCrystal® nanoparticles promise months of drug delivery from a single injection and the possibility of tuning the delivery to intervals of anything from daily to once monthly. However, a key requirement for optimal application of these formulations is a detailed understanding of how they interact with cellular membranes. This was the focus of work involving a collaboration between Dr Marité Cárdenas (Copenhagen) and Dr Richard Campbell and Dr Erik Watkins (ILL). In this experiment the team used neutrons to analyse the interaction of the liquid crystalline particles with a model cellular membrane whilst varying two parameters:

  • Gravity -- to see how the interaction changed if the aggregates attacked the cell membrane from below as opposed to above
  • Electrostatics -- how the balance between the contrasting positive and negative charges of the aggregate and membrane affect the interaction

Detailed surface information with bouncing electrons

The team utilised a technique known as neutron reflectometry whereby beams of neutrons are skimmed off a surface and the reflectivity measured is used to infer detailed information about the surface, including the thickness, detailed structure and composition of any layers beneath. These experiments were carried out on the FIGARO instrument at the ILL in Grenoble which offers unique reflection up vs. down modes that allowed the team to examine the top and bottom surfaces, alternating the samples on a two hourly basis during a 30 hour sampling period.

Small changes to charge of molecules could have major effects

The interaction of the liquid crystalline particles with the membrane was shown to be driven by the charge on the mode cell wall. Subtle changes in the amount of negative charge on the membrane wall encouraged the tree-like dendrimer molecules to penetrate through allowing the rest of the molecule to bind to the surface, forming an attached reservoir. The sensitivity of the interaction to small changes in charge suggests that simple adjustments to the proportion of charged lipids and macromolecules could optimise this process. In the future this characteristic could also provide a mechanism to focus the treatment at targeted cells such as those infected by cancer which are thought to have a more negative charge density than healthy cells.

"Cancerous cells have an imbalance that gives them a different molecular composition and overall different physical properties to normal healthy cells," explains Dr Cardenas. "Whilst all cells are negative, cancerous cells tend to be more negatively charged than healthy ones due to a different composition of fatty molecules on their surface. This is a property that we believe could be exploited in future research into delivery mechanisms involving the attachment of lamellar liquid crystalline particles. Our next step is to introduce the drug itself into the reservoirs and make sure it can move across the membrane. This work paves the way for cell tests and clinical trials in the future exploiting our methodology"

Gravity important for floating particles

In terms of gravitational affects the analysis also showed that the aggregates interacted preferentially with membranes only when they were located above the sample. Similar effects caused by the different density and buoyancy of solutions is already exploited in some stomach treatments and the researchers would encourage future studies into how gravitational effects could be used to optimise these interactions for drug delivery.

"Of course it's not new that particles in formulations can sink or float, but such dramatically different specific interactions of these nanocarriers with model membranes of different orientations took us completely by surprise" said Dr Campbell. "Very small sample volumes are often used in biomedical investigations so the effects of phase separation cannot be seen. Our findings suggest that laboratory researchers may need to re-evaluate the way in which they examine the effectiveness of newly developed formulations to account for strong gravitational effects."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Copenhagen. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Richard A. Campbell, Erik B. Watkins, Vivien Jagalski, Anna Åkesson-Runnsjö, Marité Cárdenas. Key Factors Regulating the Mass Delivery of Macromolecules to Model Cell Membranes: Gravity and Electrostatics. ACS Macro Letters, 2014; 121 DOI: 10.1021/mz400551h

Cite This Page:

University of Copenhagen. "World's tiniest drug cabinets could be attached to cancerous cells for long term treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140114203115.htm>.
University of Copenhagen. (2014, January 14). World's tiniest drug cabinets could be attached to cancerous cells for long term treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140114203115.htm
University of Copenhagen. "World's tiniest drug cabinets could be attached to cancerous cells for long term treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140114203115.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

Reuters - US Online Video (July 31, 2014) — The Republican-led House of Representatives votes to sue President Obama, accusing him of overstepping his executive authority in making changes to the Affordable Care Act. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Newsy (July 31, 2014) — Citing 81 previous studies, new research out of London suggests the benefits of smoking e-cigarettes instead of regular ones outweighs the risks. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) — Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) — Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins