Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

MMR vaccine linked to lower rate of infection-related hospital admissions

Date:
February 25, 2014
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals
Summary:
In a nationwide group of Danish children, receipt of the live measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine on schedule after vaccination for other common infections was associated with a lower rate of hospital admissions for any infections, but particularly for lower respiratory tract infections, according to a study. Childhood vaccines are recommended worldwide, based on their protective effect against the targeted diseases.

In a nationwide group of Danish children, receipt of the live measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine on schedule after vaccination for other common infections was associated with a lower rate of hospital admissions for any infections, but particularly for lower respiratory tract infections, according to a study in the February 26 issue of JAMA.

Related Articles


Childhood vaccines are recommended worldwide, based on their protective effect against the targeted diseases. However, studies from low-income countries show that vaccines may have nonspecific effects that reduce illness and death from non-targeted diseases, according to background information in the study. Such nonspecific effects of vaccines might also be important for the health of children in high-income settings.

Signe Sorup, Ph.D., of the Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues examined whether the live MMR vaccine was associated with lower rates of hospital admissions for infections among children in a higher-income setting (Denmark). The study included children 495,987 born 1997-2006 and followed from ages 11 months to 2 years. The recommended vaccination schedule was inactivated vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib) administered at ages 3, 5, and 12 months; and MMR at age 15 months.

There were 56,889 hospital admissions for any type of infection among the children in the study. The researchers found that receiving the live MMR vaccine after the inactivated DTaP-IPV-Hib vaccine was associated with a lower rate of hospital admissions for any infection. The association was particularly strong for lower respiratory tract infections and for longer hospital admissions. Children who received DTaP-IPV-Hib after MMR had a higher rate of infectious disease admission.

"The coverage with MMR is suboptimal in many high-income countries; in the present study, about 50 percent of children were not vaccinated on time. Physicians should encourage parents to have children vaccinated on time with MMR and avoid giving vaccinations out of sequence, because the present study suggests that timely MMR vaccination averted a considerable number of hospital admissions for any infection between ages 16 and 24 months," the authors write.

Editorial: Nonspecific Effects of Vaccines

In an accompanying editorial, David Goldblatt, M.B.Ch.B., Ph.D., of the UCL Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital, London, and Elizabeth Miller, F.R.C.Path., of Public Health England, London, write that the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts recently decided to revisit the issue of nonspecific effects of vaccines as part of its continued appraisal of important issues that could be relevant to inform global immunization policy.

"Systematic reviews of all available epidemiologic and immunologic evidence relevant to the issue of the nonspecific effects of vaccines on childhood mortality will be undertaken to decide whether current evidence is sufficient to lead to adjustments in policy recommendations or to warrant further scientific investigation. The study by Sorup et al is a further contribution to this body of literature. Although reanalysis of the available evidence is important, the ability to properly control for bias and confounding [factors that can influence outcomes] in observational studies is often limited, and without randomized controlled trials specifically designed to test the hypothesis, the issue of nonspecific effects of vaccines may remain subject to continuing debate."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. David Goldblatt, Elizabeth Miller. Nonspecific Effects of Vaccines. JAMA, 2014; 311 (8): 804 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.471
  2. Signe Sørup, Christine S. Benn, Anja Poulsen, Tyra G. Krause, Peter Aaby, Henrik Ravn. Live Vaccine Against Measles, Mumps, and Rubella and the Risk of Hospital Admissions for Nontargeted Infections. JAMA, 2014; 311 (8): 826 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.470

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. "MMR vaccine linked to lower rate of infection-related hospital admissions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140225162700.htm>.
The JAMA Network Journals. (2014, February 25). MMR vaccine linked to lower rate of infection-related hospital admissions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140225162700.htm
The JAMA Network Journals. "MMR vaccine linked to lower rate of infection-related hospital admissions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140225162700.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, December 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

AP (Dec. 18, 2014) — As part of a six-month investigation of child maltreatment deaths, the AP found that hundreds of deaths from horrific abuse and neglect could have been prevented. AP's Haven Daley reports. (Dec. 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dads-To-Be Also Experience Hormone Changes During Pregnancy

Dads-To-Be Also Experience Hormone Changes During Pregnancy

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) — A study from University of Michigan researchers found that expectant fathers see a decrease in testosterone as the baby's birth draws near. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) — Harvard researchers found children whose mothers were exposed to high pollution levels in the third trimester were twice as likely to develop autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) — Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins