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NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover views striated ground

Date:
February 27, 2014
Source:
NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Summary:
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has reached an area where orbital images had piqued researchers' interest in patches of ground with striations all oriented in a similar direction.

Martian Landscape With Rock Rows and Mount Sharp: This landscape scene photographed by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows rows of rocks in the foreground and Mount Sharp on the horizon.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has reached an area where orbital images had piqued researchers' interest in patches of ground with striations all oriented in a similar direction.

A close-up look at some of the striations from the rover's Navigation Camera gains extra drama by including Mount Sharp in the background. The lower slopes of that layered mountain are the mission's long-term science destination. The image is online at:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA17947

The foreground rocks are in an outcrop called "Junda," which the rover passed during a drive of 328 feet (100 meters) on Feb. 19. It paused during the drive to take the component images of the scene, then finished the day's drive. A location still ahead, called "Kimberley," where researchers plan to suspend driving for a period of science investigations, also features ground with striations.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project is using Curiosity to assess ancient habitable environments and major changes in Martian environmental conditions. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, built the rover and manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about Curiosity, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/. You can follow the mission on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and on Twitter at: http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover views striated ground." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140227121007.htm>.
NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (2014, February 27). NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover views striated ground. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140227121007.htm
NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover views striated ground." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140227121007.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

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