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Mental health problems mistaken for physical illness in children

Date:
February 28, 2014
Source:
RCN Publishing Company
Summary:
Many children are admitted to general acute wards with mental health problems mistaken for physical disease. Somatic symptoms, such as abdominal pain, headaches, limb pain and tiredness, often mask underlying problems and result in the NHS spending money on investigations to eliminate wrongly diagnosed disease. A literature review examines how children's nurses can recognize such complaints and help to address them.

Many children are admitted to general acute wards with mental health problems mistaken for physical disease. Somatic symptoms, such as abdominal pain, headaches, limb pain and tiredness, often mask underlying problems and result in the NHS spending money on investigations to eliminate wrongly diagnosed disease.

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A literature review published in Nursing Children and Young People examines how children's nurses can recognize such complaints and help to address them.

It identified that somatic complaints are linked to children's upbringing and their home environments, including unstable home lives, a chaotic upbringing and parental over-protectiveness.

The authors suggest that nurses working on the wards are in an ideal position to identify cases of children and young people presenting with somatic symptoms and provide holistic care.

They say that nurse training and practice need to be adapted to enable somatic complaints to be diagnosed quickly and ensure correct management from the start.

The article concludes that somatic disorders can, to some extent, be predicted when nurses take into consideration issues such as poor family situations and parental influences, psychosocial stress, and poor emotional functioning.

Nurses should assess these factors together with physical symptoms to provide a full picture of a child's circumstances and healthcare needs.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by RCN Publishing Company. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kerry Banks, Ann Bevan. Predictors for somatic symptoms in children. Nursing Children and Young People, 2014; 26 (1): 16 DOI: 10.7748/ncyp2014.02.26.1.16.e368

Cite This Page:

RCN Publishing Company. "Mental health problems mistaken for physical illness in children." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140228080641.htm>.
RCN Publishing Company. (2014, February 28). Mental health problems mistaken for physical illness in children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140228080641.htm
RCN Publishing Company. "Mental health problems mistaken for physical illness in children." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140228080641.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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