Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Food allergy nearly doubles among black children

Date:
March 3, 2014
Source:
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)
Summary:
Children’s food allergies are gradually increasing, but they may be as much as doubling among black children. According to a study, self-reported food allergy nearly doubled in black children over 23 years.

Children's food allergies are gradually increasing, but they may be as much as doubling among black children. According to a study published today in the March issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), self-reported food allergy nearly doubled in black children over 23 years.

"Our research found a striking food allergy trend that needs to be further evaluated to discover the cause," said Corinne Keet, MD, MS, lead study author and assistant professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University. "Although African Americans generally have higher levels of IgE, the antibody the immune system creates more of when one has an allergy, it is only recently that they have reported food allergy more frequently than white children. Whether the observed increase is due to better recognition of food allergy or is related to environmental changes remains an open question."

Researchers analyzed 452,237 children from 1988 to 2011. Of these children, it was found food allergy increased among black children at a rate of 2.1 percent per decade, 1.2 percent among Hispanics and 1 percent among whites.

"It is important to note this increase was in self-reported allergy," said Dr. Keet. "Many of these children did not receive a proper food allergy diagnosis from an allergist. Other conditions such as food intolerance can often be mistaken for an allergy, because not all symptoms associated with foods are caused by food allergy."

Another Annals paper, also released today, notes many allergists can often determine which children may outgrow their food allergy, and which might have a lifelong condition.

"Those allergic to milk, egg, soy, and wheat are more likely to tolerate these allergens over time, than those allergic to peanuts and tree nuts," said allergist Wesley Burks, MD, lead study author and ACAAI fellow. "No single test alone can predict eventual food tolerance, but when patients are under the regular care of a board-certified allergist they can be re-evaluated and tested in different ways."

Food allergy is a serious disease that can lead to a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis. When food allergy isn't properly diagnosed, the chance of anaphylaxis increases and many time patients undergo unnecessary dietary exclusions which can lead to malnourishment.

"If you think you have symptoms of a food allergy, you should see an allergist for proper testing, diagnosis and treatment," said allergist Marshall Gailen, MD, Annals editor. "You should never take matters into your own hands, whether it is self-treating your allergy or introducing an allergenic food back into your diet to see if you're still allergic."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Corinne A. Keet, Jessica H. Savage, Shannon Seopaul, Roger D. Peng, Robert A. Wood, Elizabeth C. Matsui. Temporal trends and racial/ethnic disparity in self-reported pediatric food allergy in the United States. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 2014; 112 (3): 222 DOI: 10.1016/j.anai.2013.12.007

Cite This Page:

American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "Food allergy nearly doubles among black children." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140303083206.htm>.
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). (2014, March 3). Food allergy nearly doubles among black children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140303083206.htm
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "Food allergy nearly doubles among black children." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140303083206.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mini Pacemaker Has No Wires

Mini Pacemaker Has No Wires

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Cardiac experts are testing a new experimental device designed to eliminate major surgery and still keep the heart on track. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
After Cancer: Rebuilding Breasts With Fat

After Cancer: Rebuilding Breasts With Fat

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) More than 269 million women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Many of them will need surgery and radiation, but there’s a new simple way to reconstruct tissue using a patient’s own fat. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blood Clots in Kids

Blood Clots in Kids

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Every year, up to 200,000 Americans die from a blood clot that travels to their lungs. You’ve heard about clots in adults, but new research shows kids can get them too. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Radio Waves Knock out Knee Pain

Radio Waves Knock out Knee Pain

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Doctors have used radio frequency ablation or RFA to reduce neck and back pain for years. But now, that same technique is providing longer-term relief for patients with severe knee pain. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins