Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Heating safety from mri radiofrequency energy demonstrated in variety of simulated spinal cord stimulation scenarios

Date:
March 6, 2014
Source:
American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM)
Summary:
Determining MRI RF heating safety is a complex process that requires complete understanding of the potential interactions between the MRI system, lead behavior, and individual patient characteristics. A comprehensive analysis was performed to evaluate a new MR-compatible SCS lead.

Scientific investigators demonstrated the conditional heating safety of a new spinal cord stimulation (SCS) lead designed to be compatible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) across a range of clinical scenarios. The results presented in a scientific poster today at the 30th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine are expected to have implications for improved patient safety and access to MRI.

The radiofrequency (RF) field in an MRI causes a rise in temperature at the electrode of an implanted medical lead. Heating safety during MRI is complex and requires complete understanding of the MRI system, lead behavior and individual patient characteristics, study authors said. The confirmation of their model's ability to accurately predict RF electrode heating (i.e., temperature changes) in animals provides confidence in the ability to predict heating in patients, the authors said.

"This work was used to demonstrate safety for the first FDA-approved, full-body MRI, conditionally-safe SCS system," said lead study author Heather Orser, PhD, principal electrical engineer with the Neuromodulation business of Medtronic (NYSE: MDT), a medical device company based in Minneapolis that funded the study. "Approval of the system allows SCS patients safe access to the diagnostic benefits provided by MRI for scans of any part of the body."

The research team implanted leads and temperature probes in the spinal canals of anesthetized pigs, then scanned them in a 1.5T MRI system at multiple landmarks. The animal model simulations were then compared to animal electrode temperature measurements to confirm model accuracy.

Next, researchers sought to simulate the electromagnetic effects that occur due to variations in human morphology using several MRI coils. They performed simulations for hundreds of clinical lead paths in each human model, combining the results with lead characterization analyses to predict the temperature rise at the electrodes in the spinal cord for each patient situation.

While the rises in temperature varied significantly across 10,000 different patients, device scenarios and MRI scenarios, the resulting temperature predictions demonstrated that a lead designed for reduced RF heating produced temperatures below 43 C for the full range of implant scenarios during 30 minutes of active scanning.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM). "Heating safety from mri radiofrequency energy demonstrated in variety of simulated spinal cord stimulation scenarios." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140306211034.htm>.
American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM). (2014, March 6). Heating safety from mri radiofrequency energy demonstrated in variety of simulated spinal cord stimulation scenarios. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140306211034.htm
American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM). "Heating safety from mri radiofrequency energy demonstrated in variety of simulated spinal cord stimulation scenarios." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140306211034.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins