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Fight memory loss with a smile (or chuckle)

Date:
April 27, 2014
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)
Summary:
The stress hormone cortisol can negatively affect memory and learning ability in the elderly. Researchers found that showing a 20-minute funny video to healthy seniors and seniors with diabetes helped them score better on memory tests and significantly reduced their cortisol levels when compared to non-video watchers.

Too much stress can take its toll on the body, mood, and mind. As we age it can contribute to a number of health problems, including high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease. Recent research has shown that the stress hormone cortisol damages certain neurons in the brain and can negatively affect memory and learning ability in the elderly. Researchers at Loma Linda University have delved deeper into cortisol's relationship to memory and whether humor and laughter -- a well-known stress reliever -- can help lessen the damage that cortisol can cause.

Their findings were presented on Sunday, April 27, at the Experimental Biology meeting.

Gurinder Singh Bains et al. showed a 20-minute laugh-inducing funny video to a group of healthy elderly individuals and a group of elderly people with diabetes. The groups where then asked to complete a memory assessment that measured their learning, recall, and sight recognition. Their performance was compared to a control group of elderly people who also completed the memory assessment, but were not shown a funny video. Cortisol concentrations for both groups were also recorded at the beginning and end of the experiment.

The research team found a significant decrease in cortisol concentrations among both groups who watched the video. Video-watchers also showed greater improvement in all areas of the memory assessment when compared to controls, with the diabetic group seeing the most dramatic benefit in cortisol level changes and the healthy elderly seeing the most significant changes in memory test scores.

"Our research findings offer potential clinical and rehabilitative benefits that can be applied to wellness programs for the elderly," Dr. Bains said. "The cognitive components -- learning ability and delayed recall -- become more challenging as we age and are essential to older adults for an improved quality of life: mind, body, and spirit. Although older adults have age-related memory deficits, complimentary, enjoyable, and beneficial humor therapies need to be implemented for these individuals."

Study co-author and long-time psychoneuroimmunology humor researcher, Dr. Lee Berk, added, "It's simple, the less stress you have the better your memory. Humor reduces detrimental stress hormones like cortisol that decrease memory hippocampal neurons, lowers your blood pressure, and increases blood flow and your mood state. The act of laughter -- or simply enjoying some humor -- increases the release of endorphins and dopamine in the brain, which provides a sense of pleasure and reward. These positive and beneficial neurochemical changes, in turn, make the immune system function better. There are even changes in brain wave activity towards what's called the "gamma wave band frequency," which also amp up memory and recall. So, indeed, laughter is turning out to be not only a good medicine, but also a memory enhancer adding to our quality of life."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). "Fight memory loss with a smile (or chuckle)." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140427185149.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). (2014, April 27). Fight memory loss with a smile (or chuckle). ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140427185149.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). "Fight memory loss with a smile (or chuckle)." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140427185149.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

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