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Success breeds success, study confirms

Date:
April 28, 2014
Source:
Stony Brook University
Summary:
In a study that uses website-based experiments to uncover whether “success breeds success” is a reality, researchers found that early success bestowed on individuals produced significant increases in subsequent rates of success. The findings suggest that early success that is not based on merit may produce inequality in achievement among similarly qualified individuals. But the study also found that greater amounts of initial success failed to produce greater subsequent success.

Arnout van de Rijt, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, and the Institute for Advanced Computational Science at Stony Brook University.
Credit: Image courtesy of Stony Brook University

In a Stony Brook University-led study that uses website-based experiments to uncover whether the age-old adage that "success breeds success" is a reality, researchers found that early success bestowed on individuals produced significant increases in subsequent rates of success, in comparison to non-recipients of success. The findings, to be published early online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), and supported by two grants from the National Science Foundation and by a SEED grant from Stony Brook and Brookhaven National Laboratory, suggest that early success that is not based on merit may produce inequality in achievement among similarly qualified individuals. But the study also found that greater amounts of initial success failed to produce greater subsequent success.

In the paper, titled "Field experiments of success-breeds-success dynamics," lead author Arnout van de Rijt, an Associate Professor in Stony Brook University's Department of Sociology and the Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS), and colleagues created an experimental design using real-world social settings online to investigate success accumulation. They tested the success-breeds-success hypothesis by allocating "successes" to individuals in a randomized fashion.

In one scenario, they provided funding to proposed ventures, in another awards to under-appreciated volunteers, in another endorsements of product reviews, and in yet another signatures of support to social or political campaigns.

"In each scenario, we found that early success led to more successes," said van de Rijt. "However, larger rewards bestowed by our experimentation did not proportionally increase the level of later success. This suggests that a modest initial success may be sufficient to trigger a self-propelling cascade of success in various success-breeds-success scenarios. It also suggests that philanthropists may maximize impact by granting smaller initial donations to numerous groups rather than a large donation to a single group."

Overall, the authors reported that individuals given early support were 9 to 31 percent more likely than individuals who did not receive early support to receive follow-up support from other individuals, whether that meant for funding, an award, product endorsement, or signatures of support.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Stony Brook University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. van de Rijt, S. M. Kang, M. Restivo, A. Patil. Field experiments of success-breeds-success dynamics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1316836111

Cite This Page:

Stony Brook University. "Success breeds success, study confirms." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140428154838.htm>.
Stony Brook University. (2014, April 28). Success breeds success, study confirms. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140428154838.htm
Stony Brook University. "Success breeds success, study confirms." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140428154838.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

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