Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Women's employment, caregiving workloads, effort, health profiled by researchers

Date:
April 29, 2014
Source:
Case Western Reserve University
Summary:
A profile of women with the dual responsibilities of full-time paid work and unpaid care for an elderly family member has been developed by researchers. The study is similar to how industry measures the impact of workload (including the time and difficulty of the tasks) and effort (the perceived energy it takes to do the work), researchers said. The results richly described the experiences of 46 women caregivers who work full-time and participated in the researchers' larger mixed-methods study in 2012.

A study from the Case Western Reserve University nursing school provides a profile of women with the dual responsibilities of full-time paid work and unpaid care for an elderly family member.

"We often hear caregivers talk about 'how much time and effort it takes' to provide care for their family members or neighbors," said Evanne Juratovac, PhD, RN (GCNS-BC), assistant professor of nursing at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing and the study's lead researcher, "so we examined the experience of doing the workload on these women caregivers as the 'workers."

She said the study is similar to how industry measures the impact of workload (including the time and difficulty of the tasks) and effort (the perceived energy it takes to do the work).

The results of the study, published in the March-April issue of Women's Health Issues, richly described the experiences of 46 women caregivers who work full-time and participated in the researchers' larger mixed-methods study in 2012.

The women, who averaged 51 years of age and the majority of whom cared for their parent, appeared to report health experiences that were related to the demands on their time and energy.

"While several of the women reported overall good health, the severity of depression suggests that these caregivers' mental health is in jeopardy," Juratovac said.

For example, some women may have experienced more depression related to their living situation or relationship to the care recipient; yet, some women experienced depressive symptoms that may be related to the presence of help from other family members or formal outside agencies.

The American Association for Retired Persons (AARP) and the National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC) report that about half of the 66 million family caregivers nationally also work outside the home.

And women provide more than half of the free caregiving, which AARP and NAC estimate would cost more than $450 million annually if someone were paid to do the work.

"These savings to society may overshadow the cost it has on the caregivers' economic stability and health," Juratovac said. It is known from national surveys (e.g., Metlife®) that caring for someone at home can cost employed women caregivers in obscured ways, as they may pass up job advancement, lose employment benefits by working fewer hours, and strain household budgets to pay for caregiving expenses.

Juratovac said she hopes the detailed findings promote a discussion among policymakers and employers to help employed caregivers facilitate their dual workloads.

She suggests, for example, flexible work schedules that allow employed caregivers to manage their responsibilities on behalf of their care recipient (such as consulting with health care providers) when necessary during the work day, while maintaining their productivity and managing their responsibilities in the paid workplace.

And since the researchers found it difficult to characterize the variety of "part time" employment experiences, suggestions were made -- for research and for industry -- to improve methods for measuring the time and effort that caregivers spend in caregiving tasks and other tasks over time, in order to more fully understand their full workload.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Case Western Reserve University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Evanne Juratovac, Jaclene A. Zauszniewski. Full-Time Employed and a Family Caregiver: A Profile of Women’s Workload, Effort, and Health. Women's Health Issues, 2014; 24 (2): e187 DOI: 10.1016/j.whi.2014.01.004

Cite This Page:

Case Western Reserve University. "Women's employment, caregiving workloads, effort, health profiled by researchers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140429105128.htm>.
Case Western Reserve University. (2014, April 29). Women's employment, caregiving workloads, effort, health profiled by researchers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140429105128.htm
Case Western Reserve University. "Women's employment, caregiving workloads, effort, health profiled by researchers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140429105128.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) — West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) — A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) — Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) — Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins