Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

The rich best-educated revealed as 'super-working class'

Date:
May 5, 2014
Source:
University of Oxford
Summary:
Rich, well-educated men and women are working much longer hours than those on low incomes, according to a new working paper. Compared to the 1970s when working hours were at their lowest, the best-educated men in continental Europe, for example, increased their overall work time from just over 8 hours 20 minutes per day (around 5 hours 50 minutes' paid work and 2 hours 30 minutes' unpaid housework, shopping and childcare) to 9 hours 10 minutes per day (6 hours 10 minutes' paid, 3 hours unpaid) – an increase of 20 minutes' paid work, together with 30 minutes more unpaid work.

Rich, well-educated men and women are working much longer hours than those on low incomes, according to a new working paper by the Centre for Time Use Research (CTUR) at the University of Oxford.

The researchers from the Department of Sociology based their findings on the time diaries of men and women from 16 developed countries from 1961 to the present, collected as the Multinational Time Use Study (MTUS). Compared to the 1970s when working hours were at their lowest, the best-educated men in continental Europe, for example, increased their overall work time from just over 8 hours 20 minutes per day (around 5 hours 50 minutes' paid work and 2 hours 30 minutes' unpaid housework, shopping and childcare) to 9 hours 10 minutes per day (6 hours 10 minutes' paid, 3 hours unpaid) -- an increase of 20 minutes' paid work, together with 30 minutes more unpaid work.

The study says the best-educated men used to work much shorter hours for pay -- an echo still, in the 1960s, of the end-of-the-19th-century leisure class. However, by the beginning of the 21st century they were working the longest hours, with the best-educated women appearing to show an even starker increase in working hours as compared with similarly educated women 50 years ago.

Although in the past the least educated used to work the longest hours, this data turns that idea on its head. Replacing the 19th-century leisure class is a 21st-century 'superordinate working class', says the paper by Professor Jonathan Gershuny and Dr Kimberly Fisher.

Professor Gershuny said: 'Our research, which compares the paid and unpaid working hours of people of different social backgrounds in developed economies over the last 50 years, suggests that the best educated are working harder now than they did in the 1960s. This could be because high-fliers do not see leisure time as preferable to the office. The shift away from manual labour may mean that a larger proportion of workers may now find their jobs more satisfying, emotionally and intellectually. But the generally lower paid work hours in Scandinavia and continental Europe suggest that a lack of governmental regulation of work time also plays its part.'

In most of the countries surveyed, men's and women's total work hours per day are the same to within a few minutes when paid and unpaid are combined. However, the data suggests women still do the lion's share of the domestic chores and childcare across all countries. The highly educated Nordic men are the most likely to share housework and childcare duties with their partners, but eventhey do just 45% of unpaid work, still leaving the majority to be done by women.

PDF of working paper: http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/wp20143.pdf


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Oxford. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Oxford. "The rich best-educated revealed as 'super-working class'." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140505140742.htm>.
University of Oxford. (2014, May 5). The rich best-educated revealed as 'super-working class'. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140505140742.htm
University of Oxford. "The rich best-educated revealed as 'super-working class'." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140505140742.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Science & Society News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming

The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming

AP (July 28, 2014) AP Investigation: As the Obama administration weans the country off dirty fuels, energy companies are ramping-up overseas coal exports at a heavy price. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Russia Saves Gecko Sex Satellite, Media Has Some Fun With It

Russia Saves Gecko Sex Satellite, Media Has Some Fun With It

Newsy (July 27, 2014) The satellite is back under ground control after a tense few days, but with a gecko sex experiment on board, the media just couldn't help themselves. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cellphone Unlocking Bill Clears U.S. House, Heads to Obama

Cellphone Unlocking Bill Clears U.S. House, Heads to Obama

Reuters - US Online Video (July 27, 2014) Congress gets rid of pesky law that made it illegal to "unlock" mobile phones without permission, giving consumers the option to use the same phone on a competitor's wireless network. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins