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Experiencing letters as colors: New insights into synesthesia

Date:
May 9, 2014
Source:
Taylor & Francis
Summary:
Scientists studying the bizarre phenomenon of synasthesia – best described as a “union of the senses” whereby two or more of the five senses that are normally experienced separately are involuntarily and automatically joined together – have made a new breakthrough in their attempts to understand the condition.

Colored letters and numbers. Scientists studied four synesthetes who experience color when seeing printed letters of the alphabet.
Credit: AntonioBattista Am2 / Fotolia

Scientists studying the bizarre phenomenon of synesthesia -- best described as a "union of the senses" whereby two or more of the five senses that are normally experienced separately are involuntarily and automatically joined together -- have made a new breakthrough in their attempts to understand the condition.

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V.S. Ramachandran and Elizabeth Seckel from the University of San Diego studied four synesthetes who experience color when seeing printed letters of the alphabet. Their aim was to determine at what point during sensory processing these 'colors' appeared.

To do this, the researchers asked their synesthetes -- as well as a control group -- to complete three children's picture puzzles in which words were printed backwards or were not immediately visible.

When the results were processed, Ramachandran and Seckel discovered that the synesthetes were able to complete the puzzles three times faster than the control subjects, and with fewer errors. The synesthetes also revealed that they saw the obscured letters in the puzzles in the same color as they would the 'normal' letters. This process effectively clued them in to what the letters were, and allowed them to read the distorted words much more quickly than the controls could.

Although it was just a small study, Ramachandran and Seckel's work, published in the current issue of Neurocase, 'strongly supports the interpretation that the synthetic colors are evoked preconsciously early in sensory processing'. The four synesthetes had an advantage in completing the puzzles because the 'extra' information they received when looking at the letters was then sent up to 'higher levels of sensory processing, providing additional insight for reading the distorted and backwards text': a fascinating and important insight into a condition those of us who see letters as just letters find simply baffling.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Taylor & Francis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. V.S. Ramachandran, Elizabeth Seckel. Synesthetic colors induced by graphemes that have not been consciously perceived. Neurocase, 2014; 1 DOI: 10.1080/13554794.2014.890728

Cite This Page:

Taylor & Francis. "Experiencing letters as colors: New insights into synesthesia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140509074122.htm>.
Taylor & Francis. (2014, May 9). Experiencing letters as colors: New insights into synesthesia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140509074122.htm
Taylor & Francis. "Experiencing letters as colors: New insights into synesthesia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140509074122.htm (accessed January 30, 2015).

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