Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

B12 injection not proven to increase energy, metabolism

Date:
May 13, 2014
Source:
Loyola University Health System
Summary:
Feeling sluggish? Gaining weight? What you need is a shot in the arm, claim advertisers for trendy vitamin B12 injections. Don’t let marketers needle you. “If medical testing confirms that an individual has a vitamin B12 deficiency, a vitamin B12 supplement will help. But if a B12 deficiency has not been identified by a physician or primary care doctor, there is no need to waste energy and money on B12 shots,” says a clinical dietitian.

Vitamin B12 shots are only effective if you have been medically diagnosed with a deficiency, says Ashley Barrient, registered dietitian, Loyola University Health System.
Credit: Image courtesy of Loyola University Health System

Feeling sluggish? Gaining weight? What you need is a shot in the arm, claim advertisers for trendy vitamin B12 injections.

Related Articles


Don't let marketers needle you.

"If medical testing confirms that an individual has a vitamin B12 deficiency, a vitamin B12 supplement will help. But if a B12 deficiency has not been identified by a physician or primary care doctor, there is no need to waste energy and money on B12 shots," says Ashley Barrient, clinical dietitian, Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery & Bariatric Care.

Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency include:

  • fatigue weakness
  • sore tongue tingling and numbness in fingers and toes
  • difficulty walking
  • depression/mood change
  • memory loss

"Fatigue, weakness and many of the symptoms of B12 deficiency are also symptoms of other nutrient deficiencies and medical conditions," says Barrient. "Visit your physician and discuss your symptoms before self-diagnosing and self-treating."

Vitamin B12 is water-soluble and when taken in excess, the body eliminates what it does not need. "The good news is that vitamin B12 is not stored in the body and does not build up toxicity like some other vitamins can when taken in excess through unnecessary supplementation," says Barrient. "The kidneys will remove what your body cannot use and excrete the excess through your urine."

Vitamin B12 injections offered through non-medical providers can run from $14 upwards of $50. "If you are not vitamin B12 deficient, these injections are not a good investment," says Barrient. "Milk, eggs, fish, poultry, and certain fortified cereals are excellent sources of vitamin B12 and focusing on increasing your intake through better eating is free and easy."

If a vitamin B12 deficiency is confirmed through medical testing, receiving injections from a medical provider has the benefit of not only potentially being safer but also covered by certain medical insurance.

"Your physician and dietitian are the best sources for the identification and treatment of a true nutrient deficiency, and within our Bariatric Clinic at Loyola the Physician and Dietitian work collaboratively to ensure patients achieve and maintain an optimal nutrition status throughout their weight loss journey," says Barrient. At the Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery & Bariatric Care, Barrient counsels morbidly obese patients on diet and nutrition before, during and after surgical and non-surgical weight-loss programs. "Some of our patients are found to be deficient in vitamin B12 and through our Physician prescribing appropriate vitamin B12 supplementation to correct the deficiency, some individuals note an improvement in energy level. If a deficiency does not exist, supplementing vitamin B12 will likely not have the same positive effect."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Loyola University Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Loyola University Health System. "B12 injection not proven to increase energy, metabolism." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140513161634.htm>.
Loyola University Health System. (2014, May 13). B12 injection not proven to increase energy, metabolism. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140513161634.htm
Loyola University Health System. "B12 injection not proven to increase energy, metabolism." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140513161634.htm (accessed January 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Poultry Culled in Taiwan to Thwart Bird Flu

Poultry Culled in Taiwan to Thwart Bird Flu

Reuters - News Video Online (Jan. 28, 2015) Taiwan culls over a million poultry in efforts to halt various strains of avian flu. Julie Noce reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Media Criticizing Parents For Not Vaccinating Children

Media Criticizing Parents For Not Vaccinating Children

Newsy (Jan. 28, 2015) As the Disneyland measles outbreak continues to spread, the media says parents who choose not to vaccinate their children are part of the cause. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shark Bite Victim Making Amazing Recovery

Shark Bite Victim Making Amazing Recovery

AP (Jan. 27, 2015) A Texas woman who lost more than five pounds of flesh to a shark in the Bahamas earlier this month could be released from a Florida hospital soon. Experts believe she was bitten by a bull shark while snorkeling. (Jan. 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shoveling Snow: How to Prevent Back Injuries

Shoveling Snow: How to Prevent Back Injuries

Washington Post (Jan. 26, 2015) What&apos;s the proper technique for shoveling snow? A physical therapist offers specific tips for protecting your back while you dig out this winter. Video provided by Washington Post
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins