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New sensor could light the way forward in low-cost medical imaging

Date:
May 23, 2014
Source:
University of Surrey
Summary:
A new type of light sensor that could allow medical and security imaging via low cost cameras has been developed by researchers. Near infrared light can be used to perform non-invasive medical procedures, such as measuring the oxygen level in tissue and detecting tumors. It is also already commonly used in security camera systems and for quality control in the agriculture and food industry.

New research published today in Nature's Scientific Reports, identifies a new type of light sensor that could allow medical and security imaging, via low cost cameras.

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The team of researchers from the University of Surrey have developed a new 'multispectral' light sensor that detects the full spectrum of light, from ultra-violet (UV), to visible and near infrared light.

Indeed, near infrared light can be used to perform non-invasive medical procedures, such as measuring the oxygen level in tissue and detecting tumors. It is also already commonly used in security camera systems and for quality control in the agriculture and food industry.

Researchers believe that having a single low cost near infrared system, in addition to conventional imaging, opens up many new possibilities.

"Until now specialist light sensors have been limited in the kinds of light they can detect, with multiple sensors required to measure different ranges of the light spectrum, significantly increasing cost," said lead researcher Dr Richard Curry from the University of Surrey's Advanced Technology Institute.

"This new technology could allow surgeons to 'see' inside tissue to find tumors prior to surgery as well as equip consumer products, such as cameras and mobile phones, with night imaging options. This is useful for capturing quality pictures in the dark, and may eventually enable parents to simply monitor a child's blood or tissue oxygenation level via a smartphone camera which could be linked to healthcare professionals."

The sensors are highly flexible and can be produced cheaply, using the same laser-printers found in homes and offices, and unlike other sensors, do not require specialized manufacturing conditions.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Surrey. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rinku Saran, Vlad Stolojan, Richard J. Curry. Ultrahigh Performance C60 Nanorod Large Area Flexible Photoconductor Devices via Ultralow Organic and Inorganic Photodoping. Scientific Reports, 2014; 4 DOI: 10.1038/srep05041

Cite This Page:

University of Surrey. "New sensor could light the way forward in low-cost medical imaging." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140523082928.htm>.
University of Surrey. (2014, May 23). New sensor could light the way forward in low-cost medical imaging. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140523082928.htm
University of Surrey. "New sensor could light the way forward in low-cost medical imaging." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140523082928.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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