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Glucose monitoring for diabetes made easy with a blood-less method

Date:
June 16, 2014
Source:
De Gruyter
Summary:
Treating diabetes – a major scourge of humanity bothering millions of people – requires a constant monitoring of the human blood for glucose concentrations. While current schemes employ electrochemical methods, they require extraction of blood samples. By using glucose-sensitive dyes and a nano-plasmonic interferometer, a research team has shown how to achieve much higher sensitivities in real-time measurements while using only saliva instead of blood.

Treating diabetes -- a major scourge of humanity bothering millions of people -- requires a constant monitoring of the human blood for glucose concentrations. While current schemes employ electrochemical methods, they require extraction of blood samples. By using glucose-sensitive dyes and a nano-plasmonic interferometer, a research team from Brown University has shown how to achieve much higher sensitivities in real-time measurements while using only saliva instead of blood.

In their article titled "A plasmonic cuvette": dye chemistry coupled to plasmonic interferometry for glucose sensing in the journal Nanophotonics the research team led by Domenico Pacifici describes how a suitable mixture of enzymes can be employed to selectively generate a red fluorescent molecule. These can then be selectively optically detected in a complex environment full of a plethora of other substances such as human saliva. Tiny volumes of the compound are investigated by means of a nano-structured surface of silver and aluminum oxide. As a plasmonic interferometer this structure facilitates the interactions of light with the mixture under investigation. By measuring the absorption of light of a specific wavelength the concentration of glucose can be inferred.

Non-invasively studying saliva is made possible due to the high sensitivity of this method. Although a strict dependence between glucose concentrations in blood and saliva exist, the latter is smaller by a factor of hundred. Additionally only a tiny volume of material -- around the a quarter of the volume of a water droplet -- is required to achieve this.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by De Gruyter. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Vince S. Siu, Jing Feng, Patrick W. Flanigan, G. Tayhas R. Palmore, Domenico Pacifici. A “plasmonic cuvette”: dye chemistry coupled to plasmonic interferometry for glucose sensing. Nanophotonics, 2014; 3 (3) DOI: 10.1515/nanoph-2013-0057

Cite This Page:

De Gruyter. "Glucose monitoring for diabetes made easy with a blood-less method." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140616082150.htm>.
De Gruyter. (2014, June 16). Glucose monitoring for diabetes made easy with a blood-less method. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140616082150.htm
De Gruyter. "Glucose monitoring for diabetes made easy with a blood-less method." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140616082150.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

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