Science News
from research organizations

Former athletes finish first in race for top jobs

Date:
June 17, 2014
Source:
Cornell University
Summary:
Whether you were a quarterback or point guard, past participation in competitive team sports marks you as a winner in the competition for better jobs, according to a new study. People who played a varsity high school sport are expected to be more self-confident, have more self-respect, and demonstrate more leadership than people who were part of other extracurricular activities.
Share:
       
Total shares:  
FULL STORY

Whether you were a quarterback or point guard, past participation in competitive team sports marks you as a winner in the competition for better jobs, according to a new Cornell University study.

"Participation in competitive youth sports 'spills over' to occupationally advantageous traits that persist across a person's life," says Kevin M. Kniffin, postdoctoral research associate at Cornell's Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management and lead researcher.

Research by Kniffen and his co-authors, published online this week in the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, shows that people who played a varsity high school sport are expected to be more self-confident, have more self-respect, and demonstrate more leadership than people who were part of other extracurricular activities.

Former varsity athletes also reported significantly higher prosocial volunteerism and charitable activities. Also, many ex-jock octogenerians parlayed 65-year-old leadership skills into successful management careers -- some at the highest level.

"In our study of late-career workers, those who earned a varsity letter more than 50 years ago do demonstrate these characteristics more than others -- plus, they donate time and money more frequently than others and possessed great prosocial behavior in their 70s, 80s, and 90s," said Kniffin.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cornell University. The original article was written by Melissa Osgood. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. K. M. Kniffin, B. Wansink, M. Shimizu. Sports at Work: Anticipated and Persistent Correlates of Participation in High School Athletics. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 2014; DOI: 10.1177/1548051814538099

Cite This Page:

Cornell University. "Former athletes finish first in race for top jobs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140617164241.htm>.
Cornell University. (2014, June 17). Former athletes finish first in race for top jobs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140617164241.htm
Cornell University. "Former athletes finish first in race for top jobs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140617164241.htm (accessed May 23, 2015).

Share This Page:


Science & Society News
May 23, 2015

Latest Headlines
updated 12:56 pm ET