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Genetic variants linked to severe skin reactions to antiepileptic drug identified

Date:
August 5, 2014
Source:
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
Summary:
Researchers have identified genetic variants that are associated with severe adverse skin reactions to the antiepileptic drug phenytoin, according to a new study. Phenytoin is a widely prescribed antiepileptic drug and remains the most frequently used first-line antiepileptic drug in hospitalized patients.

Researchers have identified genetic variants that are associated with severe adverse skin reactions to the antiepileptic drug phenytoin, according to a study in the August 6 issue of JAMA.

Phenytoin is a widely prescribed antiepileptic drug and remains the most frequently used first-line antiepileptic drug in hospitalized patients. Although effective for treating neurological diseases, phenytoin can cause cutaneous (skin) adverse reactions ranging from mild to severe. The pharmacogenomic basis of phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions has not been known, according to background information in the article.

Wen-Hung Chung, M.D., Ph.D., of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan, and colleagues investigated the genetic factors associated with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions. The case-control study was conducted in 2002-2014 among 105 cases with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions (n=61 Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis and n=44 drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms), 78 cases with maculopapular exanthema (a less severe type of rash), 130 phenytoin-tolerant control participants, and 3,655 population controls from Taiwan, Japan, and Malaysia. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted using the samples from Taiwan. The initial GWAS included samples of 60 cases with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions and 412 population controls from Taiwan.

Analysis of the data indicated that variants of the gene CYP2C, including CYP2C9*3, were associated with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions. The statistically significant association between CYP2C9*3, known to reduce drug clearance (the elimination of a drug from the body), and phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions was replicated by the samples from Taiwan, Japan, and Malaysia, with a meta-analysis showing an 11 times higher odds of experiencing this reaction with this variant. Delayed clearance of plasma phenytoin was detected in patients with severe cutaneous adverse reactions, especially CYP2C9*3 carriers, providing a clinical link of the associated variants to the disease.

Delayed clearance was also noted in patients with severe cutaneous adverse reactions without CYP2C9*3, suggesting that nongenetic factors such as renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction, and concurrent use of substances that compete or inhibit the enzymes may also affect phenytoin metabolism and contribute to severe cutaneous adverse reactions.

"This study identified CYP2C variants, including CYP2C9*3, known to reduce drug clearance, as important genetic factors associated with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions. These findings may have potential to improve the safety profile of phenytoin in clinical practice and offer the possibility of prospective testing for preventing phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions. More research is required to replicate the genetic association in different populations and to determine the test characteristics and clinical utility," the authors conclude.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Wen-Hung Chung, Wan-Chun Chang, Yun-Shien Lee, Ying-Ying Wu, Chih-Hsun Yang, Hsin-Chun Ho, Ming-Jing Chen, Jing-Yi Lin, Rosaline Chung-Yee Hui, Ji-Chen Ho, Wei-Ming Wu, Ting-Jui Chen, Tony Wu, Yih-Ru Wu, Mo-Song Hsih, Po-Hsun Tu, Chen-Nen Chang, Chien-Ning Hsu, Tsu-Lan Wu, Siew-Eng Choon, Chao-Kai Hsu, Der-Yuan Chen, Chin-San Liu, Ching-Yuang Lin, Nahoko Kaniwa, Yoshiro Saito, Yukitoshi Takahashi, Ryosuke Nakamura, Hiroaki Azukizawa, Yongyong Shi, Tzu-Hao Wang, Shiow-Shuh Chuang, Shih-Feng Tsai, Chee-Jen Chang, Yu-Sun Chang, Shuen-Iu Hung. Genetic Variants Associated With Phenytoin-Related Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions. JAMA, 2014; 312 (5): 525 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.7859

Cite This Page:

JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association. "Genetic variants linked to severe skin reactions to antiepileptic drug identified." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140805163254.htm>.
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association. (2014, August 5). Genetic variants linked to severe skin reactions to antiepileptic drug identified. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140805163254.htm
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association. "Genetic variants linked to severe skin reactions to antiepileptic drug identified." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140805163254.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

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