Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cognitive-behavioral coping skills training has positive effects on rheumatoid arthritis

Date:
August 23, 2014
Source:
Wayne State University Division of Research
Summary:
Two psychological interventions have been separately and in combination been studied to determine their effectiveness in offering relief to RA patients. Cognitive-behavioral coping skills training trains patients in various cognitive and behavioral techniques or skills to enhance their ability to cope with pain and improve their behavioral and psychological functioning.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a complex autoimmune disease that affects 1 to 2 percent of adults, requires patients to not only cope with pain, disability and joint disfigurements, but also other stressors such as disrupted work, family life and marital functioning. While many pharmacological advances help some RA patients, residual pain and disability is common. In addition, some patients avoid newer medications due to their high cost or side effects. Because of this, there is interest in psychosocial interventions for RA such as cognitive-behavioral and emotional processing approaches.

A team of researchers from Wayne State University and collaborators from Duke University Medical Center recently published a paper in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology that explores two psychological interventions separately and in combination to determine their effectiveness in offering relief to RA patients.

The study, "The Effects of Written Emotional Disclosure and Coping Skills Training in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial," led by Mark A. Lumley, Ph.D., professor of psychology in Wayne State University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, revealed cognitive-behavioral coping skills training (CST) had positive effects on the pain and mood of patients that lasted for at least one year, whereas written emotional closure (WED) -- expressive writing about stress -- had only temporary and inconsistent benefits on patients' joints and functioning, and did not help with pain or mood. The combination of CST and WED had had no unique benefits.

CST trains patients in various cognitive and behavioral techniques or skills to enhance their ability to cope with pain and improve their behavioral and psychological functioning. A few studies have shown that WED can reduce stress and improve health by having patients write privately for 20 minutes each day for three or four days about stressful experiences and their deepest thoughts and feelings.

"Our study revealed that patients with RA receive positive benefits in both the short and long- term using cognitive behavioral techniques such as relaxation, increasing pleasant activities, changing negative thoughts, and problem solving," said Lumley. "WED, however, was less effective, and an examination of patients' expressive writings suggests that many patients either did not have much unresolved stress or more likely did not know how to effectively identify important stressors, label and express their negative emotions, and learn from or resolve these conflicts while writing by themselves. We probably need to identify and target those patients with unresolved stress or trauma, and then help them more effectively disclose and work with their unexpressed emotions."

The research team noted that continued development and integration of therapies that target the full range of processes underlying pain and functioning -- not just biological but also behavioral, cognitive, emotional and interpersonal -- are critical for helping more RA patients have better health status.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wayne State University Division of Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mark A. Lumley, Francis J. Keefe, Angelia Mosley-Williams, John R. Rice, Daphne McKee, Sandra J. Waters, R. Ty Partridge, Jennifer N. Carty, Ainoa M. Coltri, Anita Kalaj, Jay L. Cohen, Lynn C. Neely, Jennifer K. Pahssen, Mark A. Connelly, Yelena B. Bouaziz, Paul A. Riordan. The effects of written emotional disclosure and coping skills training in rheumatoid arthritis: A randomized clinical trial.. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 2014; 82 (4): 644 DOI: 10.1037/a0036958

Cite This Page:

Wayne State University Division of Research. "Cognitive-behavioral coping skills training has positive effects on rheumatoid arthritis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140823094249.htm>.
Wayne State University Division of Research. (2014, August 23). Cognitive-behavioral coping skills training has positive effects on rheumatoid arthritis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140823094249.htm
Wayne State University Division of Research. "Cognitive-behavioral coping skills training has positive effects on rheumatoid arthritis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140823094249.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Microneedle Patch Promises Painless Pricks

Microneedle Patch Promises Painless Pricks

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 18, 2014) Researchers at The National University of Singapore have invented a new microneedle patch that could offer a faster and less painful delivery of drugs such as insulin and painkillers. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Nurse Nina Pham Arrives in Maryland

Raw: Nurse Nina Pham Arrives in Maryland

AP (Oct. 17, 2014) The first nurse to be diagnosed with Ebola at a Dallas hospital walked down the stairs of an executive jet into an ambulance at an airport in Frederick, Maryland, on Thursday. Pham will be treated at the National Institutes of Health. (Oct. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Cruise Ship Returns to US Over Ebola Fears

Raw: Cruise Ship Returns to US Over Ebola Fears

AP (Oct. 17, 2014) A Caribbean cruise ship carrying a Dallas health care worker who is being monitored for signs of the Ebola virus is heading back to Texas, US, after being refused permission to dock in Cozumel, Mexico. (Oct. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Spanish Govt: Four Suspected Ebola Cases in Spain Test Negative

Spanish Govt: Four Suspected Ebola Cases in Spain Test Negative

AFP (Oct. 17, 2014) All four suspected Ebola cases admitted to hospitals in Spain on Thursday have tested negative for the deadly virus in a first round of tests, the government said Friday. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins