Science News
from research organizations

DNA Damage Is Trigger For Apoptosis In Fanconi Anemia Cells

Date:
May 4, 1998
Source:
University Of Maryland, Baltimore
Summary:
Researchers have found that Fanconi anemia cells accumulate DNA damage at lower exposures to nitrogen mustard (a DNA-damaging agent) than do normal cells.
Share:
       
Total shares:  
FULL STORY

Researchers have found that Fanconi anemia cells accumulate DNA damage at lower exposures to a DNA-damaging agent than do normal cells. They found that in all cells, the accumulation of cells undergoing apoptosis (programmed cell death) did not occur until a certain threshold of DNA damage was reached. According to the researchers, the Fanconi anemia cells probably have an inherent defect that prevents them from repairing damaged DNA.The study was presented at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies in New Orleans, May 1-5. For interviews during the meeting, contact the press room at (504) 670-8502 or 670-8508.Researchers’ Institutional Contact: Bud Perron (212) 843-8068 bperro@rubenstein.com


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Maryland, Baltimore. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Maryland, Baltimore. "DNA Damage Is Trigger For Apoptosis In Fanconi Anemia Cells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 May 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980430102556.htm>.
University Of Maryland, Baltimore. (1998, May 4). DNA Damage Is Trigger For Apoptosis In Fanconi Anemia Cells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 22, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980430102556.htm
University Of Maryland, Baltimore. "DNA Damage Is Trigger For Apoptosis In Fanconi Anemia Cells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980430102556.htm (accessed May 22, 2015).

Share This Page:


Health & Medicine News
May 22, 2015

Latest Headlines
updated 12:56 pm ET