Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Novel Therapy To Treat Lung Cancer Patients Enrolling Patients At UCSF Cancer Center

Date:
August 21, 1998
Source:
University Of California, San Francisco
Summary:
Researchers at the UCSF Cancer Center are recruiting patients with advanced lung cancer for a clinical trial of a novel drug that they hope will inhibit the growth and spread of cancer.

Researchers at the UCSF Cancer Center are recruiting patients with advanced lung cancer for a clinical trial of a novel drug that they hope will inhibit the growth and spread of cancer.

The drug, developed by Agouron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is one of the first agents in a new class of therapies that have been shown to inhibit the actions of a natural body chemical, called Matrix Metalloproteases (MMPs), that breaks down the material between cells to make room for new cellular growth.

There is good reason for enthusiasm about this drug because the preliminary data looks favorable and suggests that MMPs inhibitors (MMPIs) are effective in slowing tumor growth, said David Jablons, MD, UCSF assistant professor of surgery and principal investigator of the study.

The inhibitors are also well tolerated because they are taken in pill form and have minimal side effects. In a normal, healthy body, MMPs play an important role in such processes as fetal development, ovulation, wound healing, and cell growth and regeneration.

However, when too many MMPs are produced or are present at the wrong time, they can break down the material, known as extracellular matrix, that holds cells together inside tissues.

This activity occurs in diseases in which healthy tissue is broken down or unhealthy tissue grows, as in cancer and rheumatoid arthritis, Jablons said.

Cancer tumors grow and spread, interfering with the functions of healthy tissue. Some MMPs have been shown to play a significant role in tumor development by contributing to three processes that lead to the progression of cancer: invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis.

Cancer researchers believe that a MMPI, called AG3340, will block these processes while limiting the damage that may result from a broad suppression of MMPs.

Invasion is the expansion of tumors into neighboring healthy tissue. MMPs act to break down the matrix structure of the healthy tissue, paving the way for the invading malignant tumor.

Metastasis is the spread of tumor cells to distant locations in the body. MMPs loosen the tissue structures, permitting cancer cells to break off and spread to other locations where they can grow. In addition, the breakdown of tissues themselves trigger the release of more MMPs, which promotes further tumor growth and expansion.

Angiogenesis is the development of new blood vessels. As a malignant tumor grows, it requires the development of blood vessels to supply its nutrients and oxygen. MMPs help these new vessels to grow by breaking down the matrix to pave the way for advancing blood vessels.

During the clinical trial of the MMPI, participating patients will be randomized to receive either a pill form of the drug or placebo in combination with chemotherapy infusions. This is a multicenter, phase III study, the stage of a trial designed to determine the drug1s effectiveness.

To quality for the trial at UCSF/Mount Zion, part of UCSF Stanford Health Care, patients must have advanced non-small cell lung cancer, a recurrence of the disease following surgery or radiation therapy, and have had no previous chemotherapy treatments.

Patients may experience side effects related to the MMPI including fatigue, joint stiffness, joint swelling, and, in a few patients, some limits on the mobility of certain joints, most often the shoulders and hands.

Those who are interested in participating in the trial should contact the UCSF Cancer Center trial coordinator Greg David at (415) 885-7283.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of California, San Francisco. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of California, San Francisco. "Novel Therapy To Treat Lung Cancer Patients Enrolling Patients At UCSF Cancer Center." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980821084640.htm>.
University Of California, San Francisco. (1998, August 21). Novel Therapy To Treat Lung Cancer Patients Enrolling Patients At UCSF Cancer Center. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980821084640.htm
University Of California, San Francisco. "Novel Therapy To Treat Lung Cancer Patients Enrolling Patients At UCSF Cancer Center." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980821084640.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins