Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Way To Modify Mammalian Genes: Honolulu Transgenesis

Date:
May 17, 1999
Source:
University Of Hawaii
Summary:
University of Hawaii scientists, together with colleagues in Japan, have developed a new method for producing transgenic mammals. The method - Honolulu transgenesis - uses sperm to deliver genetic information (DNA) from one organism into the egg of another. The egg can then divide so that every cell in the new individual contains the introduced DNA.

University of Hawaii scientists, together with colleagues in Japan, have developed a new method for producing transgenic mammals. The method - Honolulu transgenesis - uses sperm to deliver genetic information (DNA) from one organism into the egg of another. The egg can then divide so that every cell in the new individual contains the introduced DNA. The experiments demonstrated the new method using DNA for jellyfish green fluorescent protein to make green mice, and are reported in the May 14 issue of the journal, Science.

The team, whose members made headlines last summer with Honolulu cloning, reported success in producing transgenic mice by injecting eggs in a method called intracytoplasmic sperm injection. About one in five offspring resulting from the new procedure contain the introduced DNA.

The production of transgenic animals isn't new; transgenic mice were first produced in 1974, and the prevailing method of producing them by injection of DNA into the pronucleus of a one-cell embryo was first described in 1980. The pronucleus microinjection method is the most commonly used. It works well in mice, but is difficult in mammals such as cows and pigs, in which the pronucleus is difficult to locate within the cell, says Tony Perry, an assistant professor in the UH Manoa John A. Burns School of Medicine and corresponding author on the Science paper. "The great thing about this new method is that it is very straight forward," Perry says. "It may prove to be more efficient."

In Honolulu transgenesis, mouse sperm are fozen, freeze-dried, or treated with a chemical to disrupt their coat. The sperm are mixed with DNA (the researchers used from a jellyfish, but it could, in principle, be any DNA). Sperm and the DNA are then injected into oocytes. Developing embryos are transferred into a foster mother. The introduced DNA contains a gene that directs production of a protein that glows green under long-wave ultraviolet light, so the scientists could easily see that the jellyfish 'green gene' DNA was incorporated into the mouse genome if the mouse appeared green when illuminated by ultraviolet light.

The 'green gene' is just a marker to indicate that the technique works, says Perry. "We hope and believe that the technique will be useful in medical research and in development of xenotransplant donors," he says. Possible applications could include using the mouse as a model for studying the function of human genes. Also, more organs could be available for human transplant if pig genomes could be modified so that the corresponding pig organs wouldn't trigger a crtical immune rejection in patients who receive them.

Collaborators on the project include Teruhiko Wakayama, Ryuzo Yanagimachi, Hidefumi Kishikawa and Tsuyoshi Kasai of the University of Hawaii; Masaru Okabe of the Genome Information Research Center, Osaka University; and Yutaka Toyoda of the Research Center for Protozoan Molecular Immunology, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Hawaii. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Hawaii. "New Way To Modify Mammalian Genes: Honolulu Transgenesis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 May 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/05/990517064920.htm>.
University Of Hawaii. (1999, May 17). New Way To Modify Mammalian Genes: Honolulu Transgenesis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/05/990517064920.htm
University Of Hawaii. "New Way To Modify Mammalian Genes: Honolulu Transgenesis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/05/990517064920.htm (accessed July 26, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is blaming doctors for the low number of children being vaccinated for HPV. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins