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FUSE Spacecraft Will Search For "Fossils" Of The Big Bang

Date:
June 9, 1999
Source:
National Aeronautics And Space Administration
Summary:
Scientists will soon have a new tool to search for the "fossil record" of the Big Bang and uncover clues about the evolution of the universe. Scheduled to launch June 23, NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) will observe nearby planets and the farthest reaches of the universe and will provide a detailed picture of the immense structure of our own Milky Way galaxy.

Scientists will soon have a new tool to search for the "fossil record" of the Big Bang and uncover clues about the evolution of the universe. Scheduled to launch June 23, NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) will observe nearby planets and the farthest reaches of the universe and will provide a detailed picture of the immense structure of our own Milky Way galaxy.

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The FUSE mission's primary scientific focus will be the study of hydrogen and deuterium (a different form of hydrogen), which were created shortly after the Big Bang. With this information, astronomers in effect will be able to look back in time at the infant universe.

By examining these earliest relics of the birth of the universe, astronomers hope to better understand the processes that led to the formation and evolution of stars, including our solar system. Ultimately, scientists hope data from FUSE will allow them to make a huge leap of understanding about how the primordial elements were created and have been distributed since the beginning of time.

"We think that as stars age deuterium is destroyed," said NASA's Dr. George Sonneborn, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, the FUSE project scientist. "Mapping deuterium throughout the Milky Way will give us a better understanding of how elements are mixed, distributed and destroyed."

"The big questions are these: Do we understand the origins of the universe, and do we understand how galaxies evolve?" said Dr. Kenneth Sembach, a FUSE science team member from the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. "Because FUSE can observe ultraviolet light that other telescopes can't, we can test in unique ways how deuterium and other elements are circulated within galaxies. That in turn may test the limits of the Big Bang theory."

Among the cosmic questions FUSE will tackle are: -- What were conditions like in the first few minutes after the Big Bang? Will studying the "fossil remnant" deuterium change current theories of the Big Bang? -- How are the elements dispersed throughout galaxies, and how does this affect the way galaxies evolve? -- What are the properties of the interstellar gas clouds out of which stars and planets form? -- Does the Milky Way have a vast galactic fountain that gives birth to stars, spews hot gas, circulates elements and churns out cosmic material over and over?

FUSE was developed for NASA by Johns Hopkins, which has the primary responsibility for all aspects of the project. NASA is responsible for the launch. FUSE is the first NASA mission of this scope that has been developed and operated entirely by a university. Dr. Warren Moos, Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins, is Principal Investigator for FUSE.

The 3,000-pound FUSE satellite consists of two sections: the spacecraft and the science instrument. The spacecraft, built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Germantown, MD, contains all elements necessary for powering and pointing the satellite. The spacecraft and the science instrument each have their own computers, which coordinate the activities of the satellite.

The FUSE science instrument, built by Johns Hopkins, consists of telescope mirrors, a spectrograph, which breaks ultraviolet light into its component colors for study, and an electronic guide camera. Johns Hopkins built the FUSE instrument in collaboration with the Canadian Space Agency, which provided the camera; the French Space Agency, which provided a component of the spectrograph; the University of Colorado, Boulder; the University of California, Berkeley; and Swales Aerospace, Beltsville, MD. The FUSE mission and science control center is located on the Johns Hopkins Homewood Campus, Baltimore, with support from Interface and Controls Systems and AlliedSignal Technical Services Corp., both of Columbia, MD.

FUSE will be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station, FL, aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket into a circular orbit 477 miles (768 kilometers) above Earth, and will orbit about every 100 minutes. The satellite must operate on its own most of the time, moving from target to target, identifying star fields, centering objects in the spectrograph apertures and performing the observations. The three-year FUSE mission costs $204 million.

The Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD manages FUSE, one of the first missions in NASA's Origins program, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

Information on the FUSE mission and NASA's Origins program can be found at:

http://fuse.pha.jhu.edu

http://fusewww.gsfc.nasa.gov/fuse/

http://origins.jpl.nasa.gov/


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Aeronautics And Space Administration. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Aeronautics And Space Administration. "FUSE Spacecraft Will Search For "Fossils" Of The Big Bang." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 June 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/06/990609073226.htm>.
National Aeronautics And Space Administration. (1999, June 9). FUSE Spacecraft Will Search For "Fossils" Of The Big Bang. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/06/990609073226.htm
National Aeronautics And Space Administration. "FUSE Spacecraft Will Search For "Fossils" Of The Big Bang." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/06/990609073226.htm (accessed January 26, 2015).

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