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Researchers Complete Sequence And Gene Map Of Human Major Histocompatibility Complex

Date:
October 28, 1999
Source:
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Summary:
Researchers are reporting the genomic sequence of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a region on chromosome 6 essential to the immune system. The MHC controls many activities of the immune cells, including the transplantation rejection process and the killing of virus-infected cells by specific killer T lymphocytes. This region harbors several disease associations and the variability in this region between donor and recipient is a critical factor in marrow transplant matching.
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A paper authored by members of the MHC sequencing consortium is scheduled for the Oct. 28 issue of the journal Nature.

The paper describes the genomic sequence of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a region on chromosome 6 essential to the immune system. The MHC controls many activities of the immune cells, including the transplantation rejection process and the killing of virus-infected cells by specific killer T lymphocytes. This region harbors several disease associations and the variability in this region between donor and recipient is a critical factor in marrow transplant matching.

This is the first complete sequence and gene map of the MHC. This information will enable researchers to identify the positions of genes on this important segment of the human genome, helping to understand the origin of many common diseases.

In the immediate future, the sequence provides a vital tool towards improved diagnosis of disease and choice of marrow transplant recipient, by providing information that will allow us to much more accurately relate genetic variability among people to their potential for developing a large number of disease susceptibilities. This should allow for more immediate and precise diagnosis.

"This new knowledge should rapidly lead to straightforward and accurate diagnostic tests based on actual gene sequences. This should make it easier for doctors to influence the progression of some diseases by giving lifestyle advice," said Daniel Geraghty, co-author of the paper.

In the longer term, understanding the structure of disease susceptibility genes may lead to more effective treatments of existing disease. In addition to being critical in the marrow transplant process, the MHC has a large number and variety of disease associations, and thus the scope of this advance would have the potential for a broad impact on human health.

The MHC Consortium includes (alphabetical order): Drs. Stephen Beck of The Sanger Centre, Daniel E. Geraghty, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, H. Inoko with the Department of Life Sciences at Tokai University School of Medicine and Lee Rowen and Leroy Hood at the University of Washington.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. "Researchers Complete Sequence And Gene Map Of Human Major Histocompatibility Complex." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 October 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991028072039.htm>.
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. (1999, October 28). Researchers Complete Sequence And Gene Map Of Human Major Histocompatibility Complex. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991028072039.htm
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. "Researchers Complete Sequence And Gene Map Of Human Major Histocompatibility Complex." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991028072039.htm (accessed July 28, 2015).

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