Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Long Phone Call Results In "Mini-Stroke" For Psychiatrist

Date:
November 15, 1999
Source:
American Academy Of Neurology
Summary:
Cradling the phone between head and shoulder led to temporary vision loss and difficulty speaking for a healthy French psychiatrist, according to a case report in the November 10 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

ST. PAUL, MN -- Cradling the phone between head and shoulder led to temporary vision loss and difficulty speaking for a healthy French psychiatrist, according to a case report in the November 10 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The 43-year-old spent more than an hour talking to a patient, holding the phone between his left ear and shoulder so he could keep his hands free. Shortly after the call, the doctor experienced a temporary blindness in his left eye, followed by a pulsing ringing in his left ear and difficulty speaking.

An angiogram of the patient's brain showed a tear in the wall of the internal carotid artery, a key blood vessel supplying the brain, eyes and other structures in the head.

"There were no signs of a predisposition to arterial disease, but a CT scan showed that a bony structure was directly in contact with his internal carotid artery," said neurologist Mathieu Zuber, MD, of Sainte-Anne Hospital in Paris, France.

That bony structure was the psychiatrist's styloid process, a slender, pointed bone that projects from both sides of the skull under the ears and behind the jaw. Each of us has two of them, but this man's was unusually long.

Long styloid processes could be a more common cause of tears, or dissections, in the internal carotid artery than was previously thought, Zuber said. About 20 percent of strokes in young adults are caused by dissections, he said.

"Fortunately, this patient had only a transient ischemic attack, or a brief interruption in blood flow to the brain that resolved in less than 24 hours," Zuber said. "But this case shows us that everyday activities with a prolonged distortion of the neck, such as holding the phone between your ear and shoulder, can have unpredictable consequences for some people.

"Unfortunately, there is no simple procedure to identify people with long styloid processes. There haven't been any studies to determine how common these long styloid processes are, but they could be occurring more frequently than was generally thought."

The psychiatrist's symptoms disappeared within a few hours. He was given anticoagulants for three months to keep his blood from clotting. "He's had no more symptoms, but now he avoids holding the phone between his ear and shoulder for long periods," Zuber said.

###

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 16,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to improving patient care through education and research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy Of Neurology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy Of Neurology. "Long Phone Call Results In "Mini-Stroke" For Psychiatrist." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 November 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/11/991115065659.htm>.
American Academy Of Neurology. (1999, November 15). Long Phone Call Results In "Mini-Stroke" For Psychiatrist. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/11/991115065659.htm
American Academy Of Neurology. "Long Phone Call Results In "Mini-Stroke" For Psychiatrist." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/11/991115065659.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins