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Seizures are temporary abnormal electro-physiologic phenomena of the brain, resulting in abnormal synchronization of electrical neuronal activity.

They can manifest as an alteration in mental state, tonic or clonic movements, convulsions, and various other psychic symptoms (such as déja vu or jamais vu).

They are due to temporary abnormal electrical activity of a group of brain cells.

The medical syndrome of recurrent, unprovoked seizures is termed epilepsy, but some seizures may occur in people who do not have epilepsy.

The treatment of epilepsy is a subspecialty of neurology; the study of seizures is part of neuroscience.

Seizures can cause involuntary changes in body movement or function, sensation, awareness, or behavior.

A seizure can last from a few seconds to status epilepticus, a continuous seizure that will not stop without intervention.

Seizure is often associated with a sudden and involuntary contraction of a group of muscles.

However, a seizure can also be as subtle as marching numbness of a part of body, a brief loss of memory, sparkling of flashes, sensing an unpleasant odor, a strange epigastric sensation or a sensation of fear.

Therefore seizures are typically classified as motor, sensory, autonomic, emotional or cognitive.

In some cases, the full onset of a seizure event is preceded by some of the sensations described above.

Note:   The above text is excerpted from the Wikipedia article "Seizure", which has been released under the GNU Free Documentation License.
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October 9, 2015

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