Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Anti-Ige Therapy Improves Symptoms And Lowers Steroid Use In People With Allergic Asthma

Date:
December 23, 1999
Source:
National Jewish Medical And Research Center
Summary:
Some people with allergic asthma can experience improvement in their symptoms even as they reduce or completely eliminate the need for oral or inhaled corticosteroids by using anti-IgE, according to a new report published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

EMBARGOED UNTIL: December 22, 1999, 5 p.m. EST

DENVER-Some people with allergic asthma can experience improvement in their symptoms even as they reduce or completely eliminate the need for oral or inhaled corticosteroids by using anti-IgE, according to today’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

“This is a completely new approach to therapy, one that may greatly improve the treatment outlook for people with allergic asthma. It’s unlike anything that’s been used before,” said Henry Milgrom, M.D., lead author of the article and a pediatric asthma specialist at National Jewish Medical and Research Center. The study information published in the New England Journal of Medicine is the result of Phase II clinical trials. Thirty-three percent of patients in the high dose anti-IgE group and 43 percent in the low dose group completely eliminated the use of oral corticosteroids, which come in syrup and pill form. Seventeen percent taking the placebo stopped using oral corticosteroids, as well. (Researchers believe that patient education throughout the study encouraged better self-management of asthma, leading to the drop in medication use in the placebo groups.)

“Oral corticosteroids suppress the swelling and inflammation of the airways that are responsible for asthma symptoms. These drugs have serious long term side-effects, such as osteoporosis, high blood pressure, cataracts and, in children, slowed growth. The ability to eliminate or reduce the need for this medicine would be a very favorable development in the treatment of allergic asthma,” Dr. Milgrom said. Anti-IgE medication has minimal side effects. “Anti-IgE therapy may reduce steroid use in some patients and eliminate it in others,” he added.

Dr. Milgrom and other researchers around the United States were involved in a multi-center study of more than 300 adolescents and adults with moderate to severe allergic asthma. All patients used inhaled and/or oral corticosteroids to control the disease, which can be triggered by allergies to pollen, animal dander, mold or dust mites.

Patients received a high or low dose of anti-IgE, or placebo throughout the study. During the first 12 weeks, patients took anti-IgE or a placebo as well as their inhaled and/or oral corticosteroids. For the next eight weeks patients continued to take anti-IgE or placebo while they were weaned from corticosteroids.

IgE, an antibody in the immune system, causes allergic symptoms by attaching to certain cells in the body. When these cells come in contact with an allergen, a substance to which an allergy sufferer is sensitive, allergic symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, nasal congestion, hives and swelling begin. Anti-IgE binds IgE and removes it from circulation. In the study, IgE in patients’ blood was reduced by more than 95 percent. IgE was discovered by National Jewish researchers in 1966.

Symptoms, such as chest tightness, wheezing or excessive coughing, improved by 42 percent in people receiving high and 40 percent in those on low doses of anti-IgE. In people receiving the placebo, asthma symptoms improved by 30 percent.

For those using oral corticosteroids, 78 percent on high dose anti-IgE and 57 percent on low dose were able to reduce corticosteroid use by more than 50 percent. Thirty-three percent on placebo had a 50 percent reduction in oral corticosteroid use.

In addition to a reduced requirement for corticosteroids, patients had markedly improved scores on quality-of-life questionnaires that assessed their activities, asthma symptoms, emotional functioning, and symptoms induced by environmental exposures.

Anti-IgE is being developed jointly by Genentech, Inc., Novartis Pharma AG and Tanox, Inc. The companies are collaborating in the evaluation of the safety and efficacy of this drug in the therapy of asthma and seasonal allergic rhinitis. Regulatory files for the drug are expected in both the U.S. and Europe by mid-year 2000.

For more information about asthma treatment, call National Jewish’s LUNG LINE, 800-222-LUNG or e-mail, lungline@njc.org. Questions will be answered by registered nurses.

The Number 1 Respiratory Hospital in the U.S. for Two Consecutive Years, U.S. News & World Report, 1998-2000.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Jewish Medical And Research Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Jewish Medical And Research Center. "Anti-Ige Therapy Improves Symptoms And Lowers Steroid Use In People With Allergic Asthma." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 December 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991221125633.htm>.
National Jewish Medical And Research Center. (1999, December 23). Anti-Ige Therapy Improves Symptoms And Lowers Steroid Use In People With Allergic Asthma. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991221125633.htm
National Jewish Medical And Research Center. "Anti-Ige Therapy Improves Symptoms And Lowers Steroid Use In People With Allergic Asthma." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991221125633.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Cases Keep Coming for Monrovia's Island Hospital

Ebola Cases Keep Coming for Monrovia's Island Hospital

AFP (Oct. 1, 2014) A look inside Monrovia's Island Hospital, a key treatment centre in the fight against Ebola in Liberia's capital city. Duration: 00:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Puts Stress on Liberian Health Workers

Ebola Puts Stress on Liberian Health Workers

AP (Oct. 1, 2014) The Ebola outbreak is putting stress on first responders in Liberia. Ambulance drivers say they are struggling with chronic shortages of safety equipment and patients who don't want to go to the hospital. (Oct. 1) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Reassure Public Ebola Patient Won't Cause Outbreak

Doctors Reassure Public Ebola Patient Won't Cause Outbreak

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) After the announcement that the first U.S. patient had been diagnosed with Ebola, doctors were quick to say a U.S. outbreak is highly unlikely. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
TX Hospital Confirms Patient Admitted With Ebola

TX Hospital Confirms Patient Admitted With Ebola

AP (Sep. 30, 2014) Medical officials from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital confirm they are treating a patient with the Ebola virus, the first case found in the US. (Sept. 30 Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins