Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

UT Southwestern Researchers Develop Tumor Index To Diagnose Ovarian Cancer

Date:
December 29, 1999
Source:
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas
Summary:
UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas researchers have developed a new ovarian tumor index that will help physicians accurately diagnose ovarian tumors as either cancerous or benign and hopefully save thousands of women from unnecessary surgeries.

DALLAS - December 27, 1999 - UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas researchers have developed a new ovarian tumor index that will help physicians accurately diagnose ovarian tumors as either cancerous or benign and hopefully save thousands of women from unnecessary surgeries.

Related Articles


The majority of women who have ovarian tumors, confirmed through ultrasound, discover after major surgery that their tumors were benign, but physicians have such a difficult time diagnosing this deadly cancer that many recommend aggressive treatment just in case.

"The early detection of ovarian cancer is a formidable challenge and an elusive task," said Dr. Diane Twickler, associate professor of radiology and obstetrics and gynecology and an author of the report in the December issue of Cancer. "The index is a valuable way of interpreting a complex set of ultrasound findings in a reasonable fashion that will help the referring physician plan further testing, surgery or other clinical management."

Fellow author Dr. David Scott Miller, professor of obstetrics and gynecology, agreed. "The words 'ovarian cancer' are probably the most terrifying to women. And that's because it's so hard to diagnose and, thus, so deadly," Miller said.

"It may be possible that if the index indicates the mass is benign, she may be able to have a far less traumatic procedure, such as a laparoscopy," Miller said. "The information from the index may also help the physician decide whether he or she should perform the surgery or refer to a cancer specialist."

The index can also indicate which patients would benefit from serum monitoring - a series of blood tests that reveal proliferating cancer cells, Miller said.

The index was developed by evaluating characteristics of malignant and nonmalignant masses through real-time ultrasound, measurements of flow, structural measurements and checks for vessel location with methods such as color mapping. The most definitive characteristic proved to be the patient's age. The study showed a logical correlation between the patient's age and the chance of malignancy.

Of the 304 women in the study, 244 had follow-up care at UT Southwestern, which allowed their outcomes to be correlated with their prospective ultrasounds. Of those patients, 214 were diagnosed with noncancerous masses, while 30 had neoplasms that proved cancerous. Eighty-five of the noncancerous masses were benign neoplasm-type tumors. Peri-menopausal, menopausal and post-menopausal women were all included.

As the researchers suspected, patient age and the appearance, size and blood flow as revealed by ultrasound were significantly different in cancerous and noncancerous lesions. Larger, vascular tumors with abnormal appearances were more likely to represent malignant disease. Younger patients were more likely than older patients to have benign tumors.

Researchers assigned numbers to reflect the various ultrasound results. Patient-age numbers were also added to the formula. Twickler said the index's relative probability assignments are "a desirable alternative to and more realistic than absolute cut-off values between malignant and nonmalignant neoplasms."

Besides Twickler and Miller, other researchers in the study included Drs. Thalia B. Forte, assistant professor of radiology; Rigoberto Santo-Ramos, professor of obstetrics and gynecology; and Donald McIntire, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. "UT Southwestern Researchers Develop Tumor Index To Diagnose Ovarian Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 December 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991229121816.htm>.
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. (1999, December 29). UT Southwestern Researchers Develop Tumor Index To Diagnose Ovarian Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991229121816.htm
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. "UT Southwestern Researchers Develop Tumor Index To Diagnose Ovarian Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/12/991229121816.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins