Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

MRI Is First Non-Invasive Test To Detect Re-Narrowed Heart Arteries

Date:
May 29, 2000
Source:
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Summary:
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can accurately detect re-narrowed heart arteries in people who've had balloon angioplasty or other artery-clearing procedures, report researchers from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (WFUBMC) and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in this week's Circulation.

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (May 22, 2000) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can accurately detect re-narrowed heart arteries in people who've had balloon angioplasty or other artery-clearing procedures, report researchers from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (WFUBMC) and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in this week's Circulation.

MRI is the first non-invasive test to detect significant blockages as accurately as heart catheterization, the current standard test that requires a catheter and dye inside the arteries and uses X-rays to view narrowings. "About a third of people's vessels will re-narrow within six months of an artery-clearing procedure," said Greg Hundley, M.D., assistant professor of cardiology and radiology at WFUBMC. "Having a simple, non-invasive method to identify these patients would be extremely beneficial."

In the study, 17 patients who had recurrent chest pain at least three months after balloon angioplasty were tested with both MRI and heart catheterization. The two tests were found to be equally accurate (100 percent) at detecting vessel blockages of 70 percent or greater. At this level of blockage physicians normally recommend treatment.

"This puts us another step closer to a non-invasive screening test for heart disease," said Kerry Link, M.D., professor of radiology and cardiology. "In this study, we've applied the technology to patients with re-narrowed arteries. But it can also be used in seemingly healthy people to detect vessel disease in time to prevent heart attacks or angina."

With the MRI test, blood flow is first measured while the heart is at rest. Patients are then given a medicine to speed up their heart rates. Flow is measured again with the heart at stress, or beating close to capacity. As heart rate increases, blood flow should increase to meet the body's needs. When it doesn't, doctors know that the blockage is significant enough to affect heart function.

"The value of MRI, in addition to being non-invasive, is that it tells us how a narrowed artery affects the heart during activity," said Hundley. "It goes beyond measuring the size of the narrowing to tell us whether the body is getting enough oxygen-rich blood."

MRI uses magnetic fields and radio waves, so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation. Patients spend about an hour in the scanner and can then go home. The test for re-narrowed arteries can be used in patients who've had balloon angioplasty as well as other artery-opening procedures, including directional or rotational atherectomy or stenting. The test is not suitable for people who have pacemakers or defibrillators, or who've had previous coronary artery bypass surgery.

Heart catheterization, or angiography, is the current standard for evaluating the effect extent and severity of heart artery blockages. A small flexible tube is passed through blood vessels into the heart. Dye is released into the vessels and X-rays are used to evaluate blockages.

The number of people who require testing for re-narrowed arteries exceeds 150,000 a year. The American Heart Association reports that one-third of the 500,000 people who undergo balloon angioplasty each year will develop re-narrowed arteries within six months. Researchers are currently working on various strategies to prevent the problem, which occurs when fatty deposits either re-grow or expand within the artery. Symptoms can include chest pain or reduced exercise tolerance.

Balloon angioplasty - inflating a tiny balloon inside an artery to crush a bockage - is the most common nonsurgical treatment for blocked arteries.

The Medical Center researchers, in addition to Hundley and Link, were Craig Hamilton, Ph.D., medical engineer; Robert J. Applegate, M.D., cardiologist; David M. Herrington, M.D., M.H.S., cardiologist; Gregory A. Braden, M.D., cardiologist; and Mark Thomas, R.N., research nurse.

Editor's Note: The original news release can be found at http://www.wfubmc.edu/cgi-bin/newsEdit2/viewNews.cgi?article=959085169&Department=LeadingServicesHomePage


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "MRI Is First Non-Invasive Test To Detect Re-Narrowed Heart Arteries." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 May 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/05/000529092445.htm>.
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. (2000, May 29). MRI Is First Non-Invasive Test To Detect Re-Narrowed Heart Arteries. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/05/000529092445.htm
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "MRI Is First Non-Invasive Test To Detect Re-Narrowed Heart Arteries." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/05/000529092445.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) — Contains graphic content. He's only 17. But Johntrell Bowles has wanted to be a doctor from a young age, despite the odds against him. He was recently the youngest participant in a cadaver program at the Indiana University NW medical school. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 20, 2014) — A patient who may have been exposed to the Ebola virus is in isolation at the Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Reasons Why Teen Birth Rates Are At An All-Time Low

Reasons Why Teen Birth Rates Are At An All-Time Low

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) — A CDC report says birth rates among teenagers have been declining for decades, reaching a new low in 2013. We look at several popular explanations. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Common Antibiotic Could Lead To Heart-Related Death

Common Antibiotic Could Lead To Heart-Related Death

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) — Danish researchers discovered patients taking clarithromycin have an increased risk of dying from a heart-related issue. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins