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Rad Hard: Microelectronic Devices Can Operate In Harsh Environments

Date:
September 15, 2000
Source:
Office Of Naval Research
Summary:
The Naval Research Laboratory recently received a patent for microelectronic devices built on silicon-on-insulator, or SOI, structures that can operate in harsh environments with greater speed and significantly reduced power needs.

The Naval Research Laboratory recently received a patent for microelectronic devices built on silicon-on-insulator, or SOI, structures that can operate in harsh environments with greater speed and significantly reduced power needs.

The chips are intended for use in outer space, nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, and particle accelerators. Improved radiation hardness is also essential for semiconducting processes such as X-ray lithography, plasma etching, and reactive ion etching.

The researchers achieve increased radiation hardness by eliminating the positive charge build-up in the buried oxide layer. NRL's innovative process implants ions, such as silicon, into an oxide layer to create electron traps and recombination centers in the buried oxide layer that will neutralize any radiation-induced positive charge. A subsequent heat treatment removes any defects caused by the process.

NRL is transferring this technology to the private sector through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement for space and missile applications.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Office Of Naval Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Office Of Naval Research. "Rad Hard: Microelectronic Devices Can Operate In Harsh Environments." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 September 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/09/000913212323.htm>.
Office Of Naval Research. (2000, September 15). Rad Hard: Microelectronic Devices Can Operate In Harsh Environments. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 15, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/09/000913212323.htm
Office Of Naval Research. "Rad Hard: Microelectronic Devices Can Operate In Harsh Environments." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/09/000913212323.htm (accessed September 15, 2014).

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