Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Low Estrogen Linked To Heart Attack In Premenopausal Women

Date:
November 24, 2000
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
A woman is more vulnerable to sudden, serious heart disease during the time of the menstrual cycle when her estrogen levels are at their lowest, according to a study presented at the American Heart Associationˇ¦s Scientific Sessions 2000. Researchers also found that other health risks only worsen the odds for heart disease in premenopausal women.

NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 14 ˇV A woman is more vulnerable to sudden, serious heart disease during the time of the menstrual cycle when her estrogen levels are at their lowest, according to a study presented today at the American Heart Associationˇ¦s Scientific Sessions 2000. Researchers also found that other health risks only worsen the odds for heart disease in premenopausal women.

ˇ§We found that significantly more premenopausal women experienced their heart attacks during or after their periods when their natural estrogen levels are low,ˇ¨ says lead researcher Bettina Hamelin, Pharm.D., who is an associate professor of pharmacy at Laval University in Quebec, Canada. ˇ§However, these young women also had a number of other important risk factors such as smoking and diabetes.ˇ¨

This estrogen/heart disease link was first recognized after the long-term Framingham, Mass., cardiovascular study in the late 1970s. After tracking the residents of the town for many years, researchers noted that age 55 seemed to be a magic number for women: before age 55, they seldom had heart attacks, but after 55, the rate increased significantly.

ˇ§They wondered, of course, what happens at 55 ˇV was it something to do with menopause? The hypothesis states that high levels of estrogen circulating in a womanˇ¦s bloodstream may help protect her heart, which could be one reason a womanˇ¦s risk of cardiovascular disease increases after menopause, when hormone levels decrease,ˇ¨ says Hamelin. ˇ§We wanted to understand whether the natural increase and decrease of estrogen during a womanˇ¦s menstrual cycle prior to menopause are related to the incidence of heart attacks in younger women.ˇ¨

The Quebec study is testing the theory that large fluctuations of 17ƒ˛-estradiol ˇV a form of estrogen that circulates through the bloodstream ˇV alter heart-disease risk enough that female test subjects would report serious heart problems during and immediately after their periods. The study included 28 premenopausal white women in the Quebec area, ages 35-47, who were admitted to the hospital for heart attack or serious chest pain. These women filled out a detailed questionnaire about their disease and medication history, symptoms, hormonal status and risk factors such as family history of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking.

Twenty of the women reported heart-related problems within five days of the beginning of their period when estrogen levels are at their lowest. The study will continue until at least 50 premenopausal women with heart attacks and known menstrual-cycle history have been recruited.

This project is part of a larger study examining the role of both traditional and genetic risk factors, as well as estrogen, on unexpected heart attacks in women. Researchers will continue to recruit a total of 600 subjects, with and without heart disease, from the French Canadian population of Quebec, which represents a genetically conserved (similar gene pool) population.

ˇ§Results, however, apply to the general Caucasian population,ˇ¨ says Hamelin. ˇ§The incidence of heart disease has actually increased in women. Women do have heart attacks prior to menopause and get very sick.ˇ¨

Hamelin says more data is needed to confirm that there is a vulnerable time during the menstrual cycle which may constitute a trigger in women at risk for heart disease.

ˇ§In the meantime, young women should be made aware of the fact that they may be at risk for heart disease and they should be very concerned about known risk factors such as a family history of heart disease, smoking, high cholesterol, diabetes and obesity,ˇ¨ she says. ˇ§In addition, all women should be counseled about the potential risks and benefits of estrogen replacement therapy consistent with the American Heart Associationˇ¦s guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention.ˇ¨

Co-authors of the study include: Julie Methot, M.Sc.; Marie Arsenault, M.D.; Paul Poirier, M.D.; Sylvie Pilote, M.Sc.; Sylvain Plante, M.D.; and Peter Bogaty, M.D.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "Low Estrogen Linked To Heart Attack In Premenopausal Women." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 November 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001120072723.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2000, November 24). Low Estrogen Linked To Heart Attack In Premenopausal Women. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001120072723.htm
American Heart Association. "Low Estrogen Linked To Heart Attack In Premenopausal Women." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001120072723.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

WHO Calls for Ban on E-Cigarette Sales to Minors

WHO Calls for Ban on E-Cigarette Sales to Minors

AFP (Aug. 26, 2014) — The World Health Organization called Tuesday on governments should ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors, warning that they pose a "serious threat" to foetuses and young people. Duration: 01:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Have You Ever Been 'Sleep Drunk?' 1 in 7 Has

Have You Ever Been 'Sleep Drunk?' 1 in 7 Has

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) — A study published in the journal "Neurology" interviewed more than 19,000 people and found 15 percent suffer from being "sleep drunk." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Does Medical Marijuana Reduce Painkiller Overdose Deaths?

Does Medical Marijuana Reduce Painkiller Overdose Deaths?

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) — A new study found fewer deaths from prescription drug overdoses in states that have legalized medical marijuana. But experts disagree on the results. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Official: British Ebola Sufferer Receiving Experimental Drug

Official: British Ebola Sufferer Receiving Experimental Drug

AFP (Aug. 26, 2014) — A British nurse infected with Ebola while working in Sierra Leone is being given the same experimental drug used on two US missionaries who have recovered for the disease, doctors in London say. Duration: 00:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins