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UCLA And NASA Take Major Step In Rehabilitation Of Some Spinal Cord Injuries

Date:
December 12, 2000
Source:
University Of California, Los Angeles
Summary:
UCLA neurophysiologists and NASA space engineers are creating a robot-like device that could help rehabilitate thousands of Americans with spinal cord injuries. The device, still in the development phase, will look like a treadmill with robotic arms, and will be fitted with a harness to support the patient's weight. The arms resemble knee braces that attach to the patient's leg, guiding the legs properly on the moving treadmill.

UCLA neurophysiologists and NASA space engineers are creating a robot-like device that could help rehabilitate thousands of Americans with spinal cord injuries.

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The device, still in the development phase, will look like a treadmill with robotic arms, and will be fitted with a harness to support the patient's weight. The arms resemble knee braces that attach to the patient's leg, guiding the legs properly on the moving treadmill.

"We see tremendous potential for rehabilitation that uses this form of therapy," said Dr. Reggie Edgerton, professor in the departments of physiological science and neurobiology at UCLA.

The robotic stepper device is one of several projects in the Neural Repair Program at the UCLA Brain Research Institute and JPL. UCLA neurologists now believe that by using the robotic stepper device in rehabilitation, some patients who are functionally confined to wheelchairs may be able to learn to walk again, and those with limited movement could improve their level of walking.

"We are developing a prototype robotic stepper device that when complete will be used as part of rehabilitation that can potentially help some people now wheelchair-bound take their first steps," said Jim Weiss, program manager for collaborative neural repair at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif. "This system can do the work of four therapists and help monitor a patient's progress in a controlled manner."

NASA and UCLA researchers emphasize that the robotic stepper is still in development and is not yet ready for use in rehabilitation. However, the device could be part of clinical trials at UCLA in about three years.

"Some rehabilitation centers around the world are starting programs that will allow therapists to train individuals affected with spinal injuries, stroke and perhaps other neuromotor disorders to improve their mobility and stepping capacity," Edgerton said. "This robotic device could help therapists in those rehabilitation efforts."

Current rehabilitation therapies are labor-intensive, and require up to four therapists. Unlike therapists who only sense and observe a patient's progress, the robotic device takes precise measurements of the person's force, speed, acceleration, and resistance, counting each step the patient takes. These precise measurements help therapists monitor the day-to-day progress of their patients and provide valuable information on the effectiveness of the therapy. These measurements will be used by a control system that can assist the robotic stepper device as needed.

JPL robotic engineers have worked alongside therapists to develop the device, which has highly sensitive sensors that collect up to 24 different data readings of the patient's activity. The device, connected to a computer, displays the information on the screen for the therapist to monitor.

According to Weiss, this same device could also someday be useful to astronauts and help them walk safely after prolonged periods in space, such as extended missions on the International Space Station.

JPL and UCLA are actively pursuing efforts to commercialize the robotic system. JPL technically supported UCLA in filing a patent application on Aug. 21.

"Many technologies developed at NASA for space exploration have tremendous medical applications. We can provide practical solutions based on our engineering experience," said Dr. Antal Bejczy, senior research scientist and lead engineer on the robotic stepper device at JPL.

The Commercial Technology Office and Life Sciences Division at NASA headquarters funds this technology. Managed for NASA by the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, JPL is the lead U.S. center for robotic exploration of the solar system.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of California, Los Angeles. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of California, Los Angeles. "UCLA And NASA Take Major Step In Rehabilitation Of Some Spinal Cord Injuries." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 December 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/12/001212070041.htm>.
University Of California, Los Angeles. (2000, December 12). UCLA And NASA Take Major Step In Rehabilitation Of Some Spinal Cord Injuries. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/12/001212070041.htm
University Of California, Los Angeles. "UCLA And NASA Take Major Step In Rehabilitation Of Some Spinal Cord Injuries." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/12/001212070041.htm (accessed April 19, 2015).

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